Best Video Sditing Software Mac

If you want a video editing software that you can use even if you don’t have much experience (and you plan on growing as a video editor while using it), then Final Cut Pro X is well worth your consideration. It may take a few tutorial videos to really get yourself ready to start doing much, but once you get your feet wet, you can do basic editing and learn more and more advanced tricks over time.

This Mac video editing software is ideal for use by anyone who wants to make training videos, show keystrokes, record mouse movement and add notes and annotations to a video. Record the screen activity and edit the video to make it the best. You can add shapes, callouts, arrows and much others to clearly explain your point. You can add your voice narration to the video or some music. You can even interact with the listeners by asking questions. Tutors, educators and anyone who would like to demonstrate something will find this tool very useful.
Remember those days when we had to rush to a professional video editing expert just to get our simplest home videos edited and made into a CD? Well, not anymore! A big thanks to the technological revolution and advanced software innovation, video editing has become like child’s play.  Now whether you want to create a beautiful birthday composition or a musical parody from camcorder, video editing doesn’t feel like hassle anymore. If you’re looking for a useful video editing software for Mac, you’ve landed at the right place. So, without wasting any extra minute, let’s explore these 15 best software to edit videos on Mac you would like to sink your teeth into.
Yes, it surely had to be #1 on this list. Apple iMovie’s simple interface makes it quite easy to use—even for amateurs. You can edit your video clips, apply a background music, or add some funky captions however you like it to be. You can also take advantage of advanced features that allow changing the speed of a video, the addition of split-screen effects and picture-in-picture capability.  You can instantly grab it from Mac App Store.
The free version of Lightworks will be a fine option for anyone who isn’t concerned much about video resolution, as you’ll still be able to output web-ready 720p videos. But, if you try out Lightworks, like how it works, and want to stick with it as your video editor of choice, you can upgrade to the Pro software and start putting out high-quality video. Plus, Lightworks is available on Windows, Mac, and Linux, so you’ll be able to stick with Lightworks even if you stop using a Mac later on.

The interface is simple enough for most people to get to grips with quickly and the real-time preview makes it easy to see exactly how your video is coming along. There is a significant limitation on the free version of the app — exports are listed to videos that are up to five minutes long. Also, there is only one transition and a handful of effects in the free version.


The simplest way to describe Premiere Elements is that it is to Premiere Pro what iMovie is to Final Cut Pro. But Elements and iMovie are two very different apps. For a start, while iMovie is free, Elements costs $100. The other main difference is that Elements is set up to automate much of the process of creating your movie masterpieces. So, for example, Quick mode takes the clips and other media you’ve imported and throws them together on the timeline, you can then re-order them, trim them and add transitions and other effects. Even here, however, the emphasis is on letting Elements do the hard work for you. So, press the Fix button and it will apply image stabilization and other ‘fixes.’ If you want to be more involved, a guided mode prompts you with onscreen tips. Of course, if you’d rather work completely manually, you can. Elements doesn’t make it as easy to import media as iMovie does, and you’ll have to download much of its additional content, like music scores, individually.
The really great news is that many of these programs are free. You might expect that free video editing software would have fewer features or produce less professional results than expensive software, but many of the free tools featured here are more than good enough to produce professional-looking movies. The only downside is that they tend to have a steep learning curve and they don’t walk you through the process of editing. However, there are plenty of video on YouTube to help you get started. Here are the best free and paid-for video editing applications for the Mac.
I don't have a mac but my uncle does and I remember us trying out loads of different video editors to compare them to the full priced equivalents (premiere pro, final cut pro, sony vegas) and I remember us trying out the first three. The limitations of iMovie may be a downfall for enthusiastic video buffs but for the novice it's great and also it's pre-installed, even better! Blender was also a pretty good one, as I recall you could import your 3D modelling into the video suite for some nifty animation. CineFX I think was probably our favourite, pretty easy to use and was like an advanced iMovie, loved every second of using it! hope this helps anyone :)
FIlmora allows you to import clips from your Mac’s hard drive, a camera, and even from social media accounts. It has a somewhat quirky interface, that may take some getting used to if you’ve used other video editors. But it has plenty to commend it including lots of effects, titling options, and audio controls. It’s neatest feature could be the lighting preset options that allows you to emulate the look of Game of Thrones, Star Wars, or House of Cards at the click of a button.
That subscription gives you access to Premiere Pro for editing all sorts of video, from 3D and even 8K. You’ll also be able to handle audio tracks, add graphics, manage light and color, and effectively put together whatever video you can imagine. If you use Adobe’s other software, like Photoshop or Illustrator, then Premiere Pro will be a great option for easily integrating different workflows.
Mac video editing tool that was developed by Apple for iOS devices (including iPod touch, iPad Mini, iPad,and iPhone) and Mac. Originally released in 1999 as an application for Mac OS 8. The third version ofiMovie was only released for OS-X, but there are modified versions so users can use it properly. iMovie isbest at importing video footage to Mac using the interface of FireWire or through USB. This video editor for Mac also importsphotos and video files from hard drives. With this video editing tool, you can edit video clips, add effectsor music. There is also included a basic color correction option as well as other video enhancementtools. Transitions like slides and fades are also possible. However, even if iMovie is rich in variousfeatures, the effects options are not really very comprehensive, when compared to other editors.

The latest version of Final Cut Pro X has the multi-track timeline needed for editing but brings in the future of video and pro features. It supports 360-degree video, graphics, and effects. You can edit together video from multi-cam recording setups and easily switching between multiple angles. And, you can create HDR content. That’s just the tip of the iceberg.
Content Samurai Review 2019 (NEW FEATURE + DEAL)
Content Samurai Review 2019 (NEW FEATURE + DEAL)

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