Easiest Video Editing Software

iMovie is one of the easiest video editing programs out there. With a couple of clicks and some dropping and dragging you can conduct high-quality edits that seriously enhance the quality of your video. And with One Step effects you can apply a variety of different editing techniques instantaneously to your whole video, with just one click. The audio editing capabilities are also a program highlight, with 19 different unique audio filters that allow you to easily edit sounds and even change voices. iMovie is considered a consumer-level editing tool, so it’s not at all hard to learn.
If you are a Mac user, I don’t think you should even consider buying any other editing software other than Final Cut Pro X. The only reason to choose any other software like Premiere Pro over the Final Cut is if you had already invested considerable time in learning some other video editor and just switched to Mac. However, if you are just starting out, Final Cut Pro is the best option for you as it is a beast on a Mac. Apple’s software are just so in sync with their hardware that you get the best possible performance. However, performance is not only the play here, as Final Cut is as powerful as any other video editor on this list. Not only that, if you are a beginner and ready to invest time and money in this software, you will find that it is one of the easier video editing software to get used to. As I said, if you are on a Mac and you can afford it, buy this one without hesitation.
I currently own a new MacBookAir which brings IMovie, I have played around with it and edited a video but have had issues following along and remembering(most importantly) all the steps needed to edit the video. Maybe it’s genuinely simple, but all the videos and instructions I have read don’t make it seem as simple. I am just looking for a program that will help me to better my videos in every way.
The best part about using Linux is that most of the software available for Linux are open-source and free. So, if you are just getting started OpenShot can be a very good option for you. OpenShot is an incredibly good free video editing tool. Its interface is clean and easy to get around and is backed by a great set of professional video editing tools including 3D-rendering, video effects, animations, keyframes, and more. Despite being open source, the software is constantly updated to bring you new features and smooth performance. The software is built on powerful FFmpeg library hence it can read and write most video and image formats. For a Linux user, OpenShot is a great place to start.
With Camtasia, you can record on-screen activities and organize the footage into professional looking videos. You can also import and edit video clips, music, and images and add interactive content, such as in-video quizzing or in-video links. Once completed, projects can easily be exported to Flash or HTML5, and watched on PCs, Macs, iPads, Android tablets, and most Android smartphones. Camtasia is very easy to use and ideal for creating marketing or tutorial videos, which can easily be integrated into powerpoint slideshows or other kinds of presentations. But if you are interested in creating longer movies or films, it might not be the best option. To learn the fundamentals of the program, check out this great Camtasia Studio tutorial or this course on Camtasia essentials.
DaVinci Resolve is arguably the most advanced video editor on the list. While it has many professional video features, its interfaces remain intuitive. Alongside video slicing and trimming you can master audio and correct color. You can also use it to add 2D and 3D titles to your video. If you just want to trim and upload your videos, the rich feature set of DaVinci Resolve may be too extensive. However, if your video project is a little more advanced, the free version of this software is hard to beat.
Good old iMovie comes baked into Mac OS. Like most native Mac apps, this video editor is very intuitive to use. It features a drag and drop interface. Mac users can use iMovie as a playground for learning the basics of video editing. Once you are up to speed, you may find that alternative video editing software in this list may better suit your needs.
Here is my problem. I use a camcorder to record my pastors sermons. The audio of his voice is muddled and hard to understand, So I’ve been recording his voice on a digital audio recorder hooked to our sound board. This audio is very understandable. I’ve been using Microsoft Movie Maker, but lost it when my computer died. I cannot download it anymore and it was not that good at syncing the separate audio track to the video track. I need a simple editor that can add in a new audio voice track and sync it to the video.
Like iMovie, Pinnacle is also considered to be a consumer-level editing program. It features an easy, user-friendly interface, with tools divided into three easy categories: capture, edit, and make movie. Unlike many other consumer-level editing programs, Pinnacle Studio Plus allows you to control brightness, contrast, hue, saturation and audio levels both before and during capture. Editing is made easy with two visual modes, storyboard and timeline, so you can easily see your movie and make creative choices.
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