Easiest Video Editing Software

Is there such a thing as a SIMPLE video editor that allows 1) video capture from our digital cameras, 2) editing capability that allows us to delete unimportant frames (Ex. I’m shooting and a UPS truck enters, blocking our shot or we take video of other people not subject matter). I pull the frame down onto a track or story board, deleting from either end of all the frames. 3) movie maker then makes the final video movie. Nothing fancy, just documentary video.
Last but not least we come to FilmoraGo. FilmoraGo is a solid video editing app without any watermarks or paid subscriptions. Add music, transitions, and trim video clips all from within the app. You can easily add themes, text, and titles to your videos. There is a desktop version starting at $44.99 a year, but you can still get a lot of editing joy from the free mobile app.
If you are looking for a professional-grade video editing software for Linux, it doesn’t get better than Lightworks. What best about Lightworks is that it offers a free version along with its paid version. So, if you are just starting out you can start with the free version and then upgrade to the paid version, once you are comfortable with your video editing skills. The company also offers a good selection of tutorial videos to get you started on your video editing journey. When it comes to features, Lightworks doesn’t disappoint. The editor natively supports almost all the video formats you can think of. When it comes to exporting the software comes with a dedicated web export (MPEG4/H.264), so your videos are share-ready as soon as you complete your editing process. It also supports multi-cam editing and can support 4K content really well. The bottom line is, this is one of the best professional-grade video editing software you can get on Linux, Period.

It is one of the cheapest full-fledged video editing software out there. The software focuses more on effects, transitions, and color correction. It provides with a precise multi-track editing environment with customisable workspaces. It also supports both 4K and multi-cam video editing along with power audio-editing tools with royalty-free music, voice-over effects and more. Just like others, it also supports most of the popular video and audio formats, so whatever format your footage is in, you don’t have to worry about compatibility issues. Basically, if you are looking for a cheap video editing software with lots of cool features, this one is the one to get.
In a world which is dominated by Windows and macOS, Linux users are often neglected when it comes to creative software such as video editors. While, it is true that most of the mainstream professional grade video-editing software doesn’t offer a Linux counterpart, there are some really good options available for Linux users. We already covered one such option in our YouTube subsection which is Shotcut. Here are some more options that you can look at:
First ..REally .It was the Classic Amiga hardware/Os before 2003 that started it all.Still cant be beat. Oh yeah its amiga wont do it , cant do it ., doesnt exist. Frist 4k is size. There is nothing over 8bit graphics 8bit layered cpu,and/ . or 2bit in sound .NO true real-time multitasking ..you cant have one without the other. You only have true 15fps. A mac is a pc ith closed source linux GET OVER IT ..stop being stuck snobs.THe Classic Amiga hardware/Os before 2003 was ,and is the best. Classic Amiga hardware/Os before 2003 cant be beat in any ares .Plus, it can do all you guys think you systems can do and more. It has true real-time Multitasking.It is true unix, IT is true 48bit graphics ,and can be true 64bi,and can be the true 64bit sound card. The Amiga toaster Flyer still cant be beat. It started the Revolution. There where many before that on the Amiga side .That still can be beat by any pc=mac.Imagine having over 50 Risc cpus mixed and matched ie 250 of them..aka SGI , ALPHA..ITANIUM/PARISC..true 256bit with it being true 64 core ,and the PPC. TOASTER-OVER/SCREAMER. ALl based on the Amiga 2000 an OCS or the original Amiga or the A4000 Amiga.Yes the Classic Amiga hardware/Os before 2003 is still being used in NASA as well.
As a beginner users, it is difficult to use as it is designe for pros. It is totally free to use and distribute. The interface is customizable and flexible color settings. On the other hand, if you a semi-pros or want to improve your video edting to a higher level, this free video editor is best for you. The thing is you need to spend many time and energy to learn it. You can have a try to see if you like it or not.
Filmora9 covers all the basic video editing, color grading and audio editing features, so there will be no need to switch to several editing tools when making videos. Besides, you can use the Chroma Keying/Green screen features to make creative videos. There’re many built-in music and sound effect library, title & text templates and filter, transition, overlay, elements and effects presets for compositing a video in a faster way.

In a world which is dominated by Windows and macOS, Linux users are often neglected when it comes to creative software such as video editors. While, it is true that most of the mainstream professional grade video-editing software doesn’t offer a Linux counterpart, there are some really good options available for Linux users. We already covered one such option in our YouTube subsection which is Shotcut. Here are some more options that you can look at:
iMovie is my favourite video editor to I recommend to beginners. It’s a shame that the software is exclusive to macOS and hence neither Windows nor Linux user can enjoy this editor. However, If you do own a Mac, you must know that iMovie comes pre-installed with your Mac which essentially makes it free. But that’s not what makes it best for beginners. The best part about iMovie is its simple and intuitive interface which is really easy to figure out, even without help. Also, Apple’s optimisation makes iMovie a really snappy editor which can be used even on older Macs without any problem. As a beginner, iMovie is the best video editor you can use on a Mac. I say this especially because iMovie acts as a really good primer for Final Cut Pro, which you are essentially going to use as you get more and more comfortable with video editing and iMovie no longer satisfies your requirements.
If you are looking for a full professional grade video editor which is also free, Hit Film Express is your best bet. The only con of using this software is the one which is same for any professional grade software, that is, you will have to invest a considerable amount of time in learning it. On the scale of video editor learning process, this one falls on the harder side. However, if you are ready to invest your time, Hit Film Express can become the only editing software that you are ever going to need. It has everything that you will need to support your expanding editing skills. The editor supports almost every know video and audio format and has over 180 visual effects which you can use. The company also keeps a great selection of free tutorials which can get you started. However, as I said earlier, you will need to invest a considerable amount of time in learning this one. Also, the editor is a little heavy on the resources so you will need a good system to run it smoothly.
The best part about using Linux is that most of the software available for Linux are open-source and free. So, if you are just getting started OpenShot can be a very good option for you. OpenShot is an incredibly good free video editing tool. Its interface is clean and easy to get around and is backed by a great set of professional video editing tools including 3D-rendering, video effects, animations, keyframes, and more. Despite being open source, the software is constantly updated to bring you new features and smooth performance. The software is built on powerful FFmpeg library hence it can read and write most video and image formats. For a Linux user, OpenShot is a great place to start.
At last, you have reached the end of the article and hopefully, now you have a fairly good idea which video editing software you should go for. The choice really depends on your need, skills, and budget. Don’t just the most popular ones, pick the one which is good for you. If this article helped in the choosing your favourite video editing software, do let us know which one you’re picked in the comments section below. Also tell us, if you are already in love with some other video editing software which is not on our list.
Any of the above video editors will work great for budding YouTube editors, however, every one of them will also cost you a lot that is if you don’t go for the free version of Avid Media Composer. That being said, if you are just starting out, you should start with a software which is not only fairly cheap but is also easy to learn. The video editors mentioned in this section are cheap and easy to learn than those mentioned above. Again, if you want the best of the bunch, choose one from the above, however, I would suggest first you start with any of these and then upgrade yourself as get more comfortable with video editing.
The best part about using Linux is that most of the software available for Linux are open-source and free. So, if you are just getting started OpenShot can be a very good option for you. OpenShot is an incredibly good free video editing tool. Its interface is clean and easy to get around and is backed by a great set of professional video editing tools including 3D-rendering, video effects, animations, keyframes, and more. Despite being open source, the software is constantly updated to bring you new features and smooth performance. The software is built on powerful FFmpeg library hence it can read and write most video and image formats. For a Linux user, OpenShot is a great place to start.
Adobe Premiere Elements, also considered a consumer-level editing program, is a great option when it comes to easy video editing programs. Basic editing tools are situated within the Effects Control palette. DVD authoring is also painless with Adobe Premiere Elements. The program provides 33 DVD menu templates and you can also design them manually. Beyond this, however, Adobe Premiere Elements also offers more advanced editing options.
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