c

4.4 Indemnification: You agree to indemnify, defend and hold Noble Samurai and its affiliates harmless from and against any and all liability and costs, including reasonable legal fees incurred by such parties, in connection with or arising out of Your (a) violation or breach of any term of this Agreement or any applicable law or regulation, whether or not referenced in this Agreement, or (b) violation of any rights of any third party, or (c) use or misuse of the Noble Samurai Software.


2.4 Exclusive Ownership: Any and all IP Rights in the Noble Samurai Software, the Noble Samurai website and any Noble Samurai Promotional Materials are and shall remain the exclusive property of Noble Samurai and/or its licensors. Nothing in this Agreement intends to transfer any such IP Rights to, or to vest any such IP Rights in, You. You are only entitled to the limited use of the IP Rights granted to You in this Agreement. You will not take any action to jeopardise, limit or interfere with Noble Samurai’s IP Rights. Any unauthorised use of Noble Samurai’s IP Rights is a violation of this Agreement as well as a violation of intellectual property laws and treaties, including without limitation copyright laws and trademark laws.
The ubiquitous Kdenlive strikes again. It has been around for years and is used by many people. I tried to use it a few months ago, but it was completely unusable. It often didn’t start, and when it did, it crashed and refused to export properly. However, for this article, I installed the latest version from the Kdenlive PPA and tried it out. Things have changed. Oh my, how things have changed.
It supports high-definition video, Blu-Ray, 3D, tethered shooting, integration of video, audio, and still images, all the usual effects such as scrolling titles, pans, and fades, animations, speed changes, audio mixing, export to multiple formats and quality levels including YouTube and Vimeo, and tons more. It is under active development and has great community support. This may be the only video program you’ll ever need.
If I was willing to continue using commercial ransomeware, what I would be doing right about now would be switching to Apple, because apple video editing does everything you need and it works. Every time over the last few years I’ve asked anyone who has made their own professional looking video what software they used, the answer is ALWAYS Apple. I know somebody who mailed all of his original home movies (we’re talking film here) to Europe so a relative using Apple could make them into DVDs. But Apple’s too busy turning into big brother for my liking, so if I have to start over, I’m migrating to Linux. There is no point in struggling to learn something new and even get good at it only to have control of your work wrested from you by corporate controls.
 Linux gets my pick as the best multi-media production platform because it is flexible, efficient, and secure. Your system resources are going to your work, rather than in supporting a bloaty operating system further bogged down by marginally-effective anti-malware software. In our previous installment we covered a range of excellent drawing and painting, photography, 3D rendering, and desktop publishing applications for Linux. And my favorite Linux distros for serious multi-media production.
The trade off is often money fortime, and the market reflects that. Tools aimed at “pros” tend to be expensive because they are based upon the money saved by their market. Few amatuers or casual users will fork out thousands of dollars for software in order to save a bit of time–even if it would be cost-effective for them, since many people never bother to do cost-benefit analysis.
Just like VidCutter, it allows you to do basic editing tasks such as to trim, cut, snap, split, and mix your videos. For people who aren’t that well-versed in English, the software provides support for several other languages. Before using it, you should probably read its documentation, which comes with a lot of useful information on how to use this software.
The developers of the Pitivi editor believe that a video editor should be flexible, and efficient. Users can choose from simple views, to a complex mode that allows experienced users to make finer edits to their project. Users get access to “hundreds of animated effects, transitions and filters”, great looking audio waveforms in the project timeline, and a timeline that supports lots of different video and audio codecs.
Just like VidCutter, it allows you to do basic editing tasks such as to trim, cut, snap, split, and mix your videos. For people who aren’t that well-versed in English, the software provides support for several other languages. Before using it, you should probably read its documentation, which comes with a lot of useful information on how to use this software.
So, there you have it. After using these many video editing software on Linux, no doubt things are improving fastly. Now which video editing software you want to use depends on your specific type of videos you edit. If you just want to throw a small home video of your cat together, I suggest you use Pitivi, and if you really want to go at it, try Kdenlive. Either way, you should be just fine. But, to answer the real question, which is, “Which is the best video editing software for Linux?”, I would probably have to say Kdenlive, overall. Pitivi is great Linux video editor – really great – but Kdenlive is a little better. It has great features, and its stability is increasing with every release.
I can always find answers to my questions just by asking google. The community is very active, and there are many tutorials for any job, from simply change speed, pan and zoom in your videos to color correction and compositing. With different workflows described, told by different people, in different ways, so you can pick ones that match your level of skills, and personal preferences. See More
Nevertheless, when you find the elusive, easy to use video editing software that has the features I mention, that doesn't crash, or at least when it does crash recovers files the user was working on, that doesn't need constant tweaking using the shell, that has reasonable, non obfuscated documentation in understandable english, please let me know. I will buy you a beer and the software without hesitation.

I’m so pleased with this software that I have been paying a monthly membership fee ever since my free trial expired. I use Vidnami for YouTube affiliate marketing. You can too. Just add a link to your affiliate offers in your video descriptions. I also turn plr articles into videos. That’s right, I don’t have to write anything. I just create videos from plr content.
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