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people people just remember that these programs are free and give u an idea and also experience on how to use them without paying, i myself have been a pc user for many year and apple has caught my eye. if i get what i want i`ll be using apple for final cut pro editing and filming but also will be running ubuntu on a dual boot for my other programs. the free programs will help me to understand how the editing process works and final cut will make me better. the best of both worlds! Cheers


The trade off is often money fortime, and the market reflects that. Tools aimed at “pros” tend to be expensive because they are based upon the money saved by their market. Few amatuers or casual users will fork out thousands of dollars for software in order to save a bit of time–even if it would be cost-effective for them, since many people never bother to do cost-benefit analysis.
Whether you’re a professional video editor looking to get some serious work done, or a regular person looking to make a quick slide show, we’ll help you find the best tool for the job. All of the video editors we cover in this list can be found in most Linux distribution’s software repositories. To install any of them, just open your package manager, search and install. Alternatively, visit the websites linked to install them.
Crash, crash, crash... when it didn't crash I found it to be in that middle zone of more than a basic editor, but not a professional one... features are not very intuitive. It took me more than 30 minutes of randomly clicking to figure out how to adjust the effects applied to a clip and then I was underwhelmed with the options. To be fair... I was looking for something specific when I tried this out. I've used Adobe and other video editors in the past and this just missed my current needs and my expectations based on past experiences. See More
I wanted to use a Linux first, open source editor but I rely on stability for work and sadly I couldn't get a workflow that didn't include a significant number of crashes and glitches. DaVinci Resolve on the other hand is absolutely stable, never crashes, never glitches, has excellent tools, a smooth workflow and incredibly fast rendering. IMO better than Premiere. See More
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The option to group multiple video and/or audio tracks is absolutely marvelous for use with multiple view angles and sound tracks. This permits you to modify all the tracks at the same time and prevents the need to constantly re-synchronize your clips. KDENlive can also edit multiple selected tracks at once without grouping them, which permits great flexibility when changing edits. See More
That said, I am also long time ‘nix user (from before we had the GUI) and other OS. Linux has its place but fast video editing isn’t one of them. My office needs to edit about 3 hours of video every day, splicing together the scenes from two fixed cameras. There is some Linux software that might do it, but it is just too slow, awkward and buggy to use. We use Womble’s DVD Wizard software on Windows on that. It’s not expensive, good support and very fast to use even on lower spec hardware.
Pierre, did you not see the mention of Blender??? It is GREAT for doing video. Yes, you do have to learn it but you want to do a good job right?? One thing to note. It is best in blender to turn the movie into a series of stills in the openEXR format. It is also important to go into settings and increase the buffer memory so that you get a much faster response as it loads much more movie at one time. Make sure to render the firm into its own director or you will have a LOT of picture files cluttering some other directory! Also more Ram mean better responsiveness and having a SSD drive is also a GREAT benefit. I would think this is true of any system.

I’m having trouble with avisynth, just the process of editing with it. I know virtualdub is connected with it, but I can’t find anyway to connect virtualdub with windows movie maker, well to open it(capture video). Anyhow, I know will try Linux. Will it give the same quality as I see on my computer when it is uploaded to youtube? Yes, beginner here…

Thankfully, you can get Vidnami at a 25% discount off its normal price. (This link will send you directly to the checkout page.) So, instead of its retail price of $47, you’ll only pay $35, saving you $12 a month forever (again, for as long as you keep your monthly subscription after clicking on the previous link and taking advantage of this discount deal).
An excellent guide and resources for anyone trying to start editing, and publishing videos. I have used few of these to achieve my video. I use Kino to capture, sometimes Kdenlive to slice( No I know how to do it in cinelerra), and finaly use the cinelerra for the rest of the editing, up to encoding. if they asked me what I wish for for my birthday, I would wish for the Kdenlive to be as powerfull as cinelerra, as it is so logical and easy to use. To me most are buggy, but at the end I managed to edit, and put my composition on Youtube. Check it out. ItÅ› all been done with Linux.

Feature wise, Cinelerra looks to be the best fit if you want to do anything serious, and that’s a problem, because it falls apart when doing anything serious thanks to a seriously bug ridden code base. I mean it! This thing is such a race-condition fest, it can’t even open its own project files on my system without crashing! (Start project, add clip, save it, try to load it … freeze!)
That said, I am also long time ‘nix user (from before we had the GUI) and other OS. Linux has its place but fast video editing isn’t one of them. My office needs to edit about 3 hours of video every day, splicing together the scenes from two fixed cameras. There is some Linux software that might do it, but it is just too slow, awkward and buggy to use. We use Womble’s DVD Wizard software on Windows on that. It’s not expensive, good support and very fast to use even on lower spec hardware.
Like you, I’ve never been able to keep Cinelerra open for more than 10 minutes but in my case, the reason wasn’t the ugly UI. The problem is rather that it is a total crashfest! I do not know a single piece of software under Linux that exhibits that many lockups, race conditions, segfaults etc etc. Heck, on my system, it can’t even load a project that it saved 2 minutes earlier without crashing and that sadly ruins the featurewise winner of the competition completely.
i want a good program that is good for making amvs (animated music videos) basically editing clips, adding effects and audio, which i am sure that most if not all video editing software does. from what i read here if i really want to go advanced i could use blender but i tried blender (for 3d modeling only though) and its quite hard. i will try it again and learn in but i am looking for something a bit simpler yet with lots of good effects. which one on this list (or not on the list) is good for a beginner. i have used Windows Live Movie Maker which is pretty simple and i know my way around it ok, maybe there are some features in it i don’t know about but i know a decent amount about it. maybe i would like something a bit more advanced but not too advanced.
Look at the screenshot I attached above. I want you to look at the left sidebar. The #01 “Getting Started” video is what I just walked you through. You can see there are more video instructions. The videos are between 2 and 5 minutes long each, so it doesn’t take long at all to become acquainted with the software. The 5 additional training videos include the following topics.
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