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Regardless of whether you’re looking for a simple video editor to help you edit footage recorded on your last vacation or a professional solution fit for an aspiring filmmaker, there’s no reason to switch to a different operating system because the number of fantastic Linux video editors has never been greater. Best of all, most Linux video editors are available for free, so you can realize all your video-editing aspirations even if you’re on a tight budget.
Gnome peep started this tendency of oversimplification. Some times you do want features. Some times you do want what you call “bloated”. ‘Less is more’ doesn’t mean less is actually more, it means “Do more with less”. It is annoying as hell when programs start to remove stuff that you actually use because they try to follow this blind tendency towards nihilism ad absurdum.
This is not a Linux defence. This is classic user interface tradeoff on all platforms- its Photoshop vs MS Paint. MS Paint might look easy to use, but as soon as you want to do anything outside its scope, it is quickly extremely difficult and frustrating- it would take an expert to do anything complex with it. Photoshop looks like a huge learning curve for my mother, but it is the best app out there for photo editing. After some practice, novices can do powerful things with Photoshop.
Just like OpenShot, it is incredibly easy to learn and use this software. Flowblade gives its users the features of video transitions, watermarks, batch rendering, and drag & drop support. In addition to that, it also supports various image/audio/video formats. It also supports proxy video editing. As I already mentioned, it’s a method of editing in which original media clips are presented on a timeline by proxy clips for light-weight editing. The full resolution of the video will be used while wrapping up the project.
The problem average people have with Cinelerra is that it is truly complicated and requires time spent learning about the real underpinnings of video production technology in order to use it to its full potential. But the learning is worth it. What a person learns by digging deep into the intricacies of video production will allow a deeper understanding of what is going on with even “hand-holding” software.
So, there you have it. After using these many video editing software on Linux, no doubt things are improving fastly. Now which video editing software you want to use depends on your specific type of videos you edit. If you just want to throw a small home video of your cat together, I suggest you use Pitivi, and if you really want to go at it, try Kdenlive. Either way, you should be just fine. But, to answer the real question, which is, “Which is the best video editing software for Linux?”, I would probably have to say Kdenlive, overall. Pitivi is great Linux video editor – really great – but Kdenlive is a little better. It has great features, and its stability is increasing with every release.
LiVES is a free video editor developed for Linux operating system. It has a blend of real-time video performance and non-linear editing. It enables users to edit and make videos without worrying about the video formats, rates, frame sized, etc. Furthermore, it also performs as a Video Jockey software because of its multitrack timelines, mixing of clips and switching.
I’m having trouble with avisynth, just the process of editing with it. I know virtualdub is connected with it, but I can’t find anyway to connect virtualdub with windows movie maker, well to open it(capture video). Anyhow, I know will try Linux. Will it give the same quality as I see on my computer when it is uploaded to youtube? Yes, beginner here…
The option to group multiple video and/or audio tracks is absolutely marvelous for use with multiple view angles and sound tracks. This permits you to modify all the tracks at the same time and prevents the need to constantly re-synchronize your clips. KDENlive can also edit multiple selected tracks at once without grouping them, which permits great flexibility when changing edits. See More
Pitivi is a Non linear video editor and also open source software that freely available. For intuitive video editing this software is designed. It supports simple features i.e. snapping, trimming, splitting, and clips cutting. Pitivi curves system supports audio mixing feature. It has the ability to use the keyboard shortcuts and scrubbers. In this video and audio can be linked together and this is a great advantage of it. It is the first open source video editor that support the MEF- material exchange format. Pritivi's user friendly interface gives drag and drop, direct manipulation, reducing complexity and native theme navigation. This software can be translated into several languages. It has also a user manual support.
Avidemux is a free, open source video editing software designed mainly for simple cutting, splitting, merging, filtering and encoding, etc. It is a cross-platform free video editing software and support various file formats with different codecs such as AVI, MPEG, MP4, ASF, etc. With it, you can easily edit your videos and output the edited videos for your iPhone, iPad, iPod, PSP, etc.
Ankush Das a.k.a. CEO_&[email protected](.in), is a very energetic person who always puts up an evil smile to counter any obstacle in his way. This dude is highly unpredictable and in fact, you can’t know what’s coming from him… be it his articles, generating an aura, or his personality. Here, he mostly covers stuff on the most popular mobile operating system (Android).
In this article, I have tried to generic list some best Ubuntu Video Editing Software. But this does not end. There is a lot of Video Editing Software available for Ubuntu. The media editing tools which I mentioned in this article will be great for you. All works well. You can try your best one. Don’t forget to share it with your friends and family. Thank you very much.
I can always find answers to my questions just by asking google. The community is very active, and there are many tutorials for any job, from simply change speed, pan and zoom in your videos to color correction and compositing. With different workflows described, told by different people, in different ways, so you can pick ones that match your level of skills, and personal preferences. See More
You’re missing the point; ‘nix has its place. Our servers run on it. My netbook runs it. My web development is done on it. Our databases run on it. But I don’t have time to “try” this bit of software or that software for video editing in the hope that it will provide the magic bullet. In any case, as I have stated elsewhere, every video editing program I have tried on linux has one or more severe failings in respect of the things I need to do. Attempts at creating robust video editing software on linux are, IMO, amateurish.
Preview very slow (need to create a proxy 25% the scale and also resize the render output and even then it's often still slow) Doing a zoom (pan/scan) requires hacks https://blender.stackexchange.com/questions/42094 Transitions are fully manual Playback speed adjustments are very manual especially if you want to keep them in sync with the audio. .... See More
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This is not a Linux defence. This is classic user interface tradeoff on all platforms- its Photoshop vs MS Paint. MS Paint might look easy to use, but as soon as you want to do anything outside its scope, it is quickly extremely difficult and frustrating- it would take an expert to do anything complex with it. Photoshop looks like a huge learning curve for my mother, but it is the best app out there for photo editing. After some practice, novices can do powerful things with Photoshop.
I use Blender 3d for most of my video editing. You can do things with it that you would not beleave! Problem is that Blender3d is its own world and learning it takes time. It is something for a pro with some 3d modeling skills or a normal person that can read and is willing to learn the GUI. Wait for Blender 3D 2.5 to come out. It has an all new interface and new improved work flows! Should be out in a month or two…
The Cinelerra entry needs updating. Not only does the provided install link not work, the separate branch GG Infinity supports 8 Linux distros and provides instructions to auto-update every month (see https://www.cinelerra-gg.org/downloads/). If the different branches are confusing, visit https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinelerra which will clarify it.

OK, as what we use in our office, bearing in mind that we need to do rapid editing and splicing of 1080p video from two fixed point cameras, we use http://www.womble.com/ DVD Wizard. The cameras (yes two) get plugged in, the files are dropped on the time lines and within seconds we can start editing. Moving through the files, editing and splicing, is fluid and quick. Rendering the final product is, of course dependent on format as you’d expect but we tend to batch our work and let the jobs run overnight.


I’m having trouble with avisynth, just the process of editing with it. I know virtualdub is connected with it, but I can’t find anyway to connect virtualdub with windows movie maker, well to open it(capture video). Anyhow, I know will try Linux. Will it give the same quality as I see on my computer when it is uploaded to youtube? Yes, beginner here…
I‘m looking for a free video editor similar to – Adobe Premiere Pro, Apple iMovie, Final Cut Pro or Microsoft Movie Maker under Linux Desktop operating system. My tasks are pretty simple such as cutting, filtering, and encoding tasks etc. Can you provide me a list of FOSS software which can be used for video capture and video editing purposes under Fedora or Ubuntu Linux desktop systems?
I can always find answers to my questions just by asking google. The community is very active, and there are many tutorials for any job, from simply change speed, pan and zoom in your videos to color correction and compositing. With different workflows described, told by different people, in different ways, so you can pick ones that match your level of skills, and personal preferences. See More
After experiencing various crashes (on Ubuntu 9.04) with Avidemux, LiVES, and Kino, I switched to Cinelerracv. I had avoided switching becasue it was a bit intimidating at first. Then I discovered the tutorials atAkirad, and with some effort, have mastered its capabilities. Combined with FFMPEG (and a neat little GUIfor it called WinFF) and Audacity for specialized audio work, I have a suite that can do whatever I want and produce it in whatever format I desire. Thanks for the reviews. They provide a great path for investigation…
Vidnami promises that you can “Create Stunning Videos Fast” with their app. You can use Vidnami video creation software to turn articles, blog posts and shorter pieces of content into videos in minutes, or so the creators claim. I’ve spent a lot of money having freelancers create videos for me, so I figured I would give Vidnami a shot.
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