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Cinelerra *had* the most promise and it’s probably good if you want to run a TV station. However, it’s not creative at all. Simple edits are easy. However, anything else can become a stunt. IMO, Kdenlive has seen the quickest growth. Lives is also doing well. In the next few years we may see those apps grow into the free alternative of Finalcut – but not Cinelerra. It does what it does, and there is no need to change.


There’s often this misconception that there are not that many video editing software for Linux out there — however, this is not the case. With the growing popularity of Linux-based operating systems, software development companies have no choice but to focus on making software specially designed for Linux distros. Accordingly, you can find several video editors on the internet for almost any Linux distribution that you are using.
Pitivi could be described as the Linux alternative to Windows Movie Maker. Both video editors have a clear user interface that doesn’t present its users with a steep learning curve, and both are intended to help regular people express themselves through videomaking. Of course, Windows Movie Maker is no longer in development, whereas Pitivi is developed by a fantastic community of people who believe in open source software.

Latest version of Vivia was launched in 2008. This highly user friendly free video editor is not only made for Linux but is also appropraite for windows. The Vivia is an easy to handle video editor which is free for both personal as well as commercial purpose. Vivia ensures easy and simple non linear editings and real time transitions on a friendly interface. It also supports multi camera feature on which clips obtained simultaneously from different cameras can also be edited.
I've a few more things to add to this review, which I will over the next few days. I've published it now because "imperfect action is always preferable to perfect inaction" so, while the spiders get to work on this I'll have a break and fill you in with more stuff very soon. In the meantime, just got and get the 7 day free trial by clicking the BIG SPINNY orange button that I took ages to animate for you - it's a total no-brainer. If you don't like it, cancel - zero risk. If you do, you will thank me (but ONLY if you take action and start making some bloody videos, alright?)
Shotcut is anther video editing software for Linux and it is an interesting one because its UI looks more like a media player than an editor. The software makes editing video very simple with the set of awesome features it has. For basic uses, it will work just fine, but if you need more powerful options, especially for advanced or professional video recording, then it may not be the best. However, with the features it has, it qualifies as a decent video editor for Linux.

Not exactly going to be a long term con. The official website clearly states the same, which is why this piece of software should not be used for important projects. Then again it is so damn good that Olive editor is right now my primary editor for most projects. The fact that there is NO stable version of this software does bother a bit as it's ability to handle complex projects is almost unpredictable. But all said and done, it's still not crashed on me even once. Even though an alpha, the best damn alpha release ever. See More


Davinci Resove is another non open source video editor for linux, like Lightworks. It used to be a very excellent color grading software, and now, it's a great video editor as well. You can do all the basic editing and some of the advanced editing on the free version (multi-camera editing, 3D editing, motion blur effects, and spatial noise reduction, etc are only available on the paid version)

Blender is the 3D computer graphics software. It is also open source and freely available, mainly used for visual effects, video games, animated films and 3D interactive application. This software is written python, c and c++. This software has main features such as skinning, 3D modeling, texturing, UV unwrapping, smoke and fluid simulation etc. some of specially for computer graphics in video editor that are rendering, video graphics editing, animating, sculpting, compositing, match moving, camera tracking, particle and soft body simulation. Also supports primitive's geometric including 3D vector graphics. Its special scan-line ray tracing can export in various variety system for internal render engine.

You’re missing the point; ‘nix has its place. Our servers run on it. My netbook runs it. My web development is done on it. Our databases run on it. But I don’t have time to “try” this bit of software or that software for video editing in the hope that it will provide the magic bullet. In any case, as I have stated elsewhere, every video editing program I have tried on linux has one or more severe failings in respect of the things I need to do. Attempts at creating robust video editing software on linux are, IMO, amateurish.
Cinelarra is for video producers who need more than OpenShot, and who want a native Linux professional-quality video editor that supports high-resolution audio and video, and advanced features such as hue and saturation, overlays, denoising, compression, normalization, time stretching, realtime effects, nested sequences, color balance, image flipping, text-to-movie, batch render and batch capture, compositing, and much more. Cinelarra has nice integration between audio and video, and makes it easy to control synchronization. Blender and Cinelarra work well together; create your splendid animations in Blender and then integrate them into a movie in Cinelarra.
I make short films, the last one was 30 minutes long, and I used Premiere Pro for it. Premiere was very buggy for me, I don’t know if this is the case for everyone, probably not. I tried (well, let’s say I’ve installed them and looked at them) a few video editors, including Cinelerra, Kdenlive. I found Cinelerra’s interface really ugly (controls, icons…) while Kdenlive seems very clean and functional. I didn’t tried them with real projects, but I’ll try to. But I just can’t imagine Cinelerra is a good software, seeing his ugliness :)
What’s great about most Linux video editing software applications is that they tend to be free and open source, which means that anyone can peek under the hood and implement new features or fix bugs. The video editors featured in this article are loosely arranged according to their popularity, but we recommend you go through the entire list because even less popular video editors have a lot to offer.
This tool is way ahead of the current OpenSource alternatives. Whilst Blender is a 3D tool with a video editor, this is a video editor with a 3D modeler and it does video editing very well. Motion stabilization, transitions, color grading... all shine. If you don't mind using a closed source application, this is the best free (and possibly non-free) video editor as of 2019. See More
If you're new to SEO, you might not be that impressed, but believe me, this is impressive. Do you think the video will rank on page 1 of Google soon? Hell yes! There are a whole load of video SEO techniques employed with this that I've not got time to go through in this review, but you can learn about through any of my online courses or by reading my book: "The Best Digital Marketing Strategy in the Galaxy (Probably)" - there's a whole chapter in there 🙂
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