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That said, I am also long time ‘nix user (from before we had the GUI) and other OS. Linux has its place but fast video editing isn’t one of them. My office needs to edit about 3 hours of video every day, splicing together the scenes from two fixed cameras. There is some Linux software that might do it, but it is just too slow, awkward and buggy to use. We use Womble’s DVD Wizard software on Windows on that. It’s not expensive, good support and very fast to use even on lower spec hardware.
Hi! I'm Zohaib Ahsan, contributor to FOSS Linux. I'm studying computer science, I’ve learned a thing or two about operating systems that are based on Linux. This has made me join FOSS Linux where I can share what I have learned with the rest of the world. Not to mention — some major tea is going to be spilled as well — as I share with you the latest developments in the world of Linux.
This is not a Linux defence. This is classic user interface tradeoff on all platforms- its Photoshop vs MS Paint. MS Paint might look easy to use, but as soon as you want to do anything outside its scope, it is quickly extremely difficult and frustrating- it would take an expert to do anything complex with it. Photoshop looks like a huge learning curve for my mother, but it is the best app out there for photo editing. After some practice, novices can do powerful things with Photoshop.
Looking to quickly edit a video on Linux? Consider using Shotcut. It’s a non-linear, cross-platform, multi-track video editing tool that is great and easy to use. The video editor has support for adding titles, cutting and splicing clips together, as well as keyframe options, and more. It’s certainly not as complex as something like Lightworks, or as user-friendly as OpenShot, but it’s a solid editor that can get the job done. If you’re looking for a competent video editing tool, Shotcut might be a great choice.
Ya know, I have to chime in here. I am using Ubuntu. I love it but what I don’t love is the attitude of some of the Ubuntu techies. I am not a programmer but I am far from computer illiterate, in fact, over the weekend I was in the company of a computer programmer who complimented me on my knowledge…self-taught at that. I like the challenge of Ubuntu but sometimes you just need a question answered that will help you move on to your next phase of research. I sometimes spend weeks…WEEKS, researching a problem before I ask a question. And that is not a complaint…I like doing the research. What I don’t like are the snotty responses you sometimes get from the techies…almost as bad as Mac lovers. So I have learned not to bother with the Ubuntu support sites so much and just do general research on the ‘net , like YouTube (where I have found many of my answers, thank you). On the one hand…it’s too bad some of the attitudes are so cheeky. On the other hand, I learn a lot.

The ubiquitous Kdenlive strikes again. It has been around for years and is used by many people. I tried to use it a few months ago, but it was completely unusable. It often didn’t start, and when it did, it crashed and refused to export properly. However, for this article, I installed the latest version from the Kdenlive PPA and tried it out. Things have changed. Oh my, how things have changed.
Kino is a great program, but it only does standard definition video, and everything has to be converted to DV files (meaning you need a gigabyte for every 5 minutes of video, so editing an hour long video can easily take 12 gigabytes). Sound editing can also be a bit difficult, but one can always export the soundtrack, edit in Audacity, then dub it back in (and I’ve done this for a couple of videos I’ve made). It’s still my favorite video editing program in spite of these limitations, for now.
 Linux gets my pick as the best multi-media production platform because it is flexible, efficient, and secure. Your system resources are going to your work, rather than in supporting a bloaty operating system further bogged down by marginally-effective anti-malware software. In our previous installment we covered a range of excellent drawing and painting, photography, 3D rendering, and desktop publishing applications for Linux. And my favorite Linux distros for serious multi-media production.
I’m having trouble with avisynth, just the process of editing with it. I know virtualdub is connected with it, but I can’t find anyway to connect virtualdub with windows movie maker, well to open it(capture video). Anyhow, I know will try Linux. Will it give the same quality as I see on my computer when it is uploaded to youtube? Yes, beginner here…
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I’m so pleased with this software that I have been paying a monthly membership fee ever since my free trial expired. I use Content Samurai for YouTube affiliate marketing. You can too. Just add a link to your affiliate offers in your video descriptions. I also turn plr articles into videos. That’s right, I don’t have to write anything. I just create videos from plr content.
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