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I’ve had good luck with Lives. I’ve been able to accomplish things with it that I couldn’t figure out how to do with the others. My main use of video is for web sites. I’ve even created a video sequence from a JPEG still which I then manipulated with Lives tools and output as an animated GIF. I further tune the size of the animation in GIMP which allowed me adjust the the frame rate on a per frame basis.
Preview very slow (need to create a proxy 25% the scale and also resize the render output and even then it's often still slow) Doing a zoom (pan/scan) requires hacks https://blender.stackexchange.com/questions/42094 Transitions are fully manual Playback speed adjustments are very manual especially if you want to keep them in sync with the audio. .... See More
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Not exactly going to be a long term con. The official website clearly states the same, which is why this piece of software should not be used for important projects. Then again it is so damn good that Olive editor is right now my primary editor for most projects. The fact that there is NO stable version of this software does bother a bit as it's ability to handle complex projects is almost unpredictable. But all said and done, it's still not crashed on me even once. Even though an alpha, the best damn alpha release ever. See More
Coming from a film editing background I *know* how to edit, it’s just the tools I need to master. It should not be that hard. What’s finally pushed me over the edge is that the windows codec is broken (I have the worst lemon version of XP you can imagine) so that I can’t even see the images for the thousands of hours of video I have recorded with my Canon camera in the premium video editing software available for Windows But I can’t replace the codec because Windows thinks it works, so it won’t reinstall. Which is too bad because I slaved to learn that bloody commercial editing software that cost a bomb and got quite good at it. But intuitive? No way, Pierre.
It has got a tremendous range of tools and techniques to provide the best experience of audio video editing. There are 2 move and 3 trim tools alongwith 4 techniques of appending, overwriting and inserting a clip on the timeline. Another great feature of this video editor is that if has more than 50 image filters and more than 30 audio filters to ensure the best video and audio editing output.
The ubiquitous Kdenlive strikes again. It has been around for years and is used by many people. I tried to use it a few months ago, but it was completely unusable. It often didn’t start, and when it did, it crashed and refused to export properly. However, for this article, I installed the latest version from the Kdenlive PPA and tried it out. Things have changed. Oh my, how things have changed.
I have worked with several commercial offerings including Final Cut Pro, Premiere and Video Wave. I recently used Cinelera (on Ubuntu Hardy) on several projects and I like it very much. Cinelera is much more powerful than Video Wave and is more near the class of Final Cut Pro and Premiere. Sure, Cinelera has some stability issues from time to time but they are not major and it also recovers nicely since it saves your most recent changes anyway. To be fair, I have seen similar stability issues with the commercial products as well so I do not find this aspect of Cinelera any different.
Using Linux does not mean that you can’t have high-quality software on your system. Apart from the video mentioned above editors, there are tons of other software available in the market for Linux. Some of them are aimed at professionals (just like Lightworks, DaVinci Resolve, and Blender), while others cater to the requirements of beginners (similar to Shotcut and VidCutter). Moreover, you will also be able to easily download and install video editors on your Linux system, as most of them are already available on the app store.
Last 5 years of my 7 years Linux experience I was regularly challenged by day-to-day video editing tasks. Main content was 720p/1080i/1080p in ts/m2ts/mp4/mov. The most useful instruments that produced a really nice results was combination of avidemux, kdenlive and VirtualDub (under Wine). As per my experience you are able to get excellent results with those tools but the problem is workflow really uncertain and not stable sometimes. Lack of features also has place. But the situation changes. Right now Kdenlive project is really nice. It has tons of features and stable enough for relatively serious editing/finishing. I am sure this won’t be too hard for any person interested to learn Kdenlive workflow. Otherwise this person is too lazy for Linux in general. You may find plenty of video lessons on ytube/vimeo.
With this editor, users will get numerous titles and transitions, support for most video and image formats. You also get a fantastic export feature that lets you export files in various formats. As previously mentioned, the software caters to the demands of novice learners; expert users need not be disappointed; it provides support for professional video formats such as 4K.

This Linux video editing software is an interesting one. Kino is not your typical iMovie-style non-linear video editor. It appears to have been created in order to primarily cut a single video, or maybe a couple of videos to make a home video. It works pretty well but it requires one to use only standard NTSC or PAL formats with their respective framerates and video sizes. All in all, the video editor is stable and easy to use, but very limited.


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What’s great about most Linux video editing software applications is that they tend to be free and open source, which means that anyone can peek under the hood and implement new features or fix bugs. The video editors featured in this article are loosely arranged according to their popularity, but we recommend you go through the entire list because even less popular video editors have a lot to offer.

You can develop your very own motifs. You can add your very own logo designs and brand name watermarks, consist of great background pictures as well as different textures along with individualizing the font styles and colors quickly (just a few clicks of the computer mouse) to make extra professional-looking video clips as well as match your company’s/ site’s design and also look.
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