c

If I was willing to continue using commercial ransomeware, what I would be doing right about now would be switching to Apple, because apple video editing does everything you need and it works. Every time over the last few years I’ve asked anyone who has made their own professional looking video what software they used, the answer is ALWAYS Apple. I know somebody who mailed all of his original home movies (we’re talking film here) to Europe so a relative using Apple could make them into DVDs. But Apple’s too busy turning into big brother for my liking, so if I have to start over, I’m migrating to Linux. There is no point in struggling to learn something new and even get good at it only to have control of your work wrested from you by corporate controls.
Not exactly going to be a long term con. The official website clearly states the same, which is why this piece of software should not be used for important projects. Then again it is so damn good that Olive editor is right now my primary editor for most projects. The fact that there is NO stable version of this software does bother a bit as it's ability to handle complex projects is almost unpredictable. But all said and done, it's still not crashed on me even once. Even though an alpha, the best damn alpha release ever. See More
The latest version of DaVinci Resolve features a dual timeline that allows users to quickly navigate the whole edit and trim without zooming and scrolling. There’s also a brand-new video editing engine that leverages machine learning to enable features such as facial recognition, speed warp, and others. All in all, DaVinci Resolve shows just how far Linux video editors have come over the years.

The point is, I make some of my income from editing video files. They are an important part of our business’s value adding strategies. So I don’t have time to experiment. I need something that works and is easy for our staff to master. Windows and Mac software does and, like most businesses, we’re happy to pay the price so that we can get on with the job. BTW, the package we’re using costs less than $100.00 per seat, has easy to understand configuration and user settings, is easy to master, makes editing, cutting, dubbing a doddle. It also batches files for rendering (from the GUI). it is reliable and robust, comes with excellent support and the authors have been quick to respond to requests for new features. It is also written to actually run in a multitasking environment so we can do other things when video files are being rendered. Linux authors, take note.
Thankfully, you can get Content Samurai at a 25% discount off its normal price. (This link will send you directly to the checkout page.) So, instead of its retail price of $47, you’ll only pay $35, saving you $12 a month forever (again, for as long as you keep your monthly subscription after clicking on the previous link and taking advantage of this discount deal).

7.3 No waiver: The failure to exercise, or delay in exercising, a right, power or remedy provided to Noble Samurai by this Agreement or by law shall not constitute a waiver of that right, power or remedy. If Noble Samurai waives a breach of any provision of this Agreement this shall not operate as a waiver of a subsequent breach of that provision, or as a waiver of a breach of any other provision.
Introducing Lightworks, it’s a commercial video editing suite for Linux, Mac and Windows. It’s a non-linear tool with a completely different approach to editing video. Instead of a simple GTK or Qt window that is manipulated by the desktop environment (and themed by it too), the app offers up a full screen editing environment. Lightworks isn’t free. In fact, unlike the other apps on this list it actually requires a monthly subscription to use but it’s worth it if you want to edit and produce video on Linux.
This is not a Linux defence. This is classic user interface tradeoff on all platforms- its Photoshop vs MS Paint. MS Paint might look easy to use, but as soon as you want to do anything outside its scope, it is quickly extremely difficult and frustrating- it would take an expert to do anything complex with it. Photoshop looks like a huge learning curve for my mother, but it is the best app out there for photo editing. After some practice, novices can do powerful things with Photoshop.
People who dislike Linux usually say that it’s not great for professional, high quality video production and as a result the industry ignores it and doesn’t take it seriously. This isn’t entirely true.  It is very much a fact that Apple Computer will never release Final Cut Pro for Ubuntu, and Adobe will never make a FlatPak version of Premiere, but it doesn’t matter. Some commercial, professional video editing tools do find their way onto Linux.

Feature wise, Cinelerra looks to be the best fit if you want to do anything serious, and that’s a problem, because it falls apart when doing anything serious thanks to a seriously bug ridden code base. I mean it! This thing is such a race-condition fest, it can’t even open its own project files on my system without crashing! (Start project, add clip, save it, try to load it … freeze!)
I've a few more things to add to this review, which I will over the next few days. I've published it now because "imperfect action is always preferable to perfect inaction" so, while the spiders get to work on this I'll have a break and fill you in with more stuff very soon. In the meantime, just got and get the 7 day free trial by clicking the BIG SPINNY orange button that I took ages to animate for you - it's a total no-brainer. If you don't like it, cancel - zero risk. If you do, you will thank me (but ONLY if you take action and start making some bloody videos, alright?)
×