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I’m having trouble with avisynth, just the process of editing with it. I know virtualdub is connected with it, but I can’t find anyway to connect virtualdub with windows movie maker, well to open it(capture video). Anyhow, I know will try Linux. Will it give the same quality as I see on my computer when it is uploaded to youtube? Yes, beginner here…
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Shotcut is another free, open-source, and cross-platform video editor. Unlike Kdenlive, novice video editors will be able to get a full-fledged experience with Shotcut as it is rather easy to use. It comes with a wide range of features, including native timeline editing, video transitions and filters, and a multitrack timeline. It supports keyframes for filter parameters and 3-point editing. If you quickly need to delete the audio from a video clip, Shotcut gets it done.

Cinelerra *had* the most promise and it’s probably good if you want to run a TV station. However, it’s not creative at all. Simple edits are easy. However, anything else can become a stunt. IMO, Kdenlive has seen the quickest growth. Lives is also doing well. In the next few years we may see those apps grow into the free alternative of Finalcut – but not Cinelerra. It does what it does, and there is no need to change.

Kino is a great program, but it only does standard definition video, and everything has to be converted to DV files (meaning you need a gigabyte for every 5 minutes of video, so editing an hour long video can easily take 12 gigabytes). Sound editing can also be a bit difficult, but one can always export the soundtrack, edit in Audacity, then dub it back in (and I’ve done this for a couple of videos I’ve made). It’s still my favorite video editing program in spite of these limitations, for now.
Whether you’re cutting a feature or just editing a short or two or even a youtube video, having an NLE that you don’t have to wonder about (whether it’s going to just slowly fall apart) is preferable. What is the basic stuff most people use? I’m a rather accomplished editor and I find that even for the simplest projects I tend to use advanced techniques. However, that doesn’t stop me hoping that someday someone is going to create an NLE for Linux (commercial or not) so that I can make the switch full time. Because I love the command line and I love the free part, and I like being part of the friendly community…the more time I can spend hacking wifi the better.
Cinelarra has two versions: the unsupported community version and a commercial edition. Every six months the nice Cinelarra developers release the latest source code. It’s not widely available in the usual distro repositories, but the good Cinelerra-CV folks bundle it up into Arch, Debian, Fedora, Ubuntu, and other distro packages. There is a Cinelarra PPA— Personal Package Archive– for Ubuntu users. PPAs are user-supported repositories for specific applications, like Cinelarra. They’re not official repos, but they allow you to use your normal Ubuntu package manager to install and remove third-party software.
After experiencing various crashes (on Ubuntu 9.04) with Avidemux, LiVES, and Kino, I switched to Cinelerracv. I had avoided switching becasue it was a bit intimidating at first. Then I discovered the tutorials atAkirad, and with some effort, have mastered its capabilities. Combined with FFMPEG (and a neat little GUIfor it called WinFF) and Audacity for specialized audio work, I have a suite that can do whatever I want and produce it in whatever format I desire. Thanks for the reviews. They provide a great path for investigation…
Pitivi has been around for a few years too. This video editor for Linux is a GNOME application and is designed to fit into the GNOME desktop. (I assume it will work just fine in KDE or XFCE too.) Installing it requires the use of Flatpak, but they give rather easy-to-use instructions on the Pitivi website, and I had no problems at all. Drag-and-drop seems to be well supported, and it first transcodes videos before they can be used, which takes a few minutes or seconds, depending on the size of each. But it appears the videos can still be used during this process.
I can always find answers to my questions just by asking google. The community is very active, and there are many tutorials for any job, from simply change speed, pan and zoom in your videos to color correction and compositing. With different workflows described, told by different people, in different ways, so you can pick ones that match your level of skills, and personal preferences. See More

Applying effects is as easy as drag and drop. But if you want to edit them, you'd need to right click on each clip and select Properties. You'd need to experiment with not-so-well documented parameters which take forever to preview just to see if you are on the right track. It is sort of easy to learn unless you want more than drag and drop controls. See More


It has been a long known fact that there is a larger variety of software products for Windows and Macs compared to Linux. And even though Linux is continuously growing it is still hard to find some specific software. We know many of you like editing videos and that you often need to switch back to Windows in order to make some easy video editing tasks.
Fanboi nonsense. There are many reasonably priced software packages out there that will do all and more than most folks want and need. We need to edit videos from two 1080p fixed point camera sources on a daily basis. The package we use costs less than $100 and puts many of the so called “professional” systems to absolute shame. Regrettably it’s WIndows only, but if it works, use it.
This video editing software offers customizable layout support, a clip list, a multi-track timeline, automatic backup, keyframe special effects, and transitions. Are you using any unique file format or camcorder? Not a problem — Kdenlive supports almost everything available. It should also be mentioned Kdenlive supports Mac OSX and FreeBSD as well. Another important feature is the Proxy editing. This cool feature can automatically create low-resolution copies of your source clips to allow light-weight editing, and then render using full resolution.
It supports high-definition video, Blu-Ray, 3D, tethered shooting, integration of video, audio, and still images, all the usual effects such as scrolling titles, pans, and fades, animations, speed changes, audio mixing, export to multiple formats and quality levels including YouTube and Vimeo, and tons more. It is under active development and has great community support. This may be the only video program you’ll ever need.
Davinci Resove is another non open source video editor for linux, like Lightworks. It used to be a very excellent color grading software, and now, it's a great video editor as well. You can do all the basic editing and some of the advanced editing on the free version (multi-camera editing, 3D editing, motion blur effects, and spatial noise reduction, etc are only available on the paid version)

Applying effects is as easy as drag and drop. But if you want to edit them, you'd need to right click on each clip and select Properties. You'd need to experiment with not-so-well documented parameters which take forever to preview just to see if you are on the right track. It is sort of easy to learn unless you want more than drag and drop controls. See More
Feature wise, Cinelerra looks to be the best fit if you want to do anything serious, and that’s a problem, because it falls apart when doing anything serious thanks to a seriously bug ridden code base. I mean it! This thing is such a race-condition fest, it can’t even open its own project files on my system without crashing! (Start project, add clip, save it, try to load it … freeze!)
Do all this in a basic newly opened blender session. Then click save as default. Then when you open a new blend you will always have these presets select. If you do this mid work in some blend you are working that blend will become your default (almost never what you want to do). You might also want to skim through the addons. Blender has a lot of power that comes turned off by default but nothing much for film editor.
Internet Marketing Mozie is a online marketing blog bringing your the latest reviews on IM products, SEO Software and Services, Internet Marketing Guides, PLR Products and WordPress tools. I have been blogging and doing internet marking for around 10 years now and have learned a lot. Check out my blog to get in depth reviews of the best IM products, services and tools out there! And get my free online business coaching courses if you sign-up to my email list. (They're easily worth $297 or more!)
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