c

Shotcut is another free, open-source, and cross-platform video editor. Unlike Kdenlive, novice video editors will be able to get a full-fledged experience with Shotcut as it is rather easy to use. It comes with a wide range of features, including native timeline editing, video transitions and filters, and a multitrack timeline. It supports keyframes for filter parameters and 3-point editing. If you quickly need to delete the audio from a video clip, Shotcut gets it done.
What’s great about most Linux video editing software applications is that they tend to be free and open source, which means that anyone can peek under the hood and implement new features or fix bugs. The video editors featured in this article are loosely arranged according to their popularity, but we recommend you go through the entire list because even less popular video editors have a lot to offer.
Trey has a good point, I don’t want to do much more than combine my video with a few transitions and a soundtrack. Kdenlive works fine for that. My biggest issue with Linux video editing is the lack of good transitions and simple drag and drop functionality. Also DVD menu creation is still really poor on Linux. But over the last four years it has gotten much better.
I’ve used video editing software in Windows, and there is *nothing* intuitive about it. All of the software programs I’ve used are so loaded with DRM that trying to burn your home movies to DVD is a an adventure, often in futility. One of the commercial “home use” software package I bought was fairly intuitive, but the DRM made it incapable of burning DVDs. My prime reason for wanting to be able to video edit is so I can put together home movie compilations for all the computer illiterates and senior citizens in my family. They watch movies on TV and can just about handle popping a DVD in. I’m tired of having some of my homemade DVDs work in Dad’s machine, but then refusing to play in my sister’s.
When working a film convert it from movie format to a bunch of stills (you can render it so. I think andrew has a video on this). Make sure to do this in a unique directory because you get about 24 pics per second. The format for these pics should be png or if you want to do a lot of composting then OpenExr is the way to go but the files are bigger and might slow down and older machine. Think of it this way. PNG has 0-255 for each color of each pixel, whole numbers only. Try multiplying that by .1 and then by 1000 a few times and see what you get. The other system uses floating point math for each dot and that keeps it high quality. PNG works but don’t expect much in the way of high quality compositing.

The easiest answer is perhaps the lack of commercial applications for desktop Linux, even for a popular distribution like Ubuntu. There is no shortage of quality desktop apps like LibreOffice, Firefox, GIMP and VLC – even Minecraft runs perfectly well with OpenJDK Java – but when it comes to multimedia creation, Linux desktop distributions still left behind. With no Photoshop, After Effects, Ableton Live, or Premiere Pro for Linux, we have to turn to alternatives. For image editing, GIMP and Inkscape have Linux pretty well covered, while Bitwig and Ardour meet most Linux audio editing needs. Thus, here follows my review of a few readily available Linux video editing software (I tested them on an up-to-date Ubuntu 18.04 LTS 64-bit system.) This list is not in order from best to worse or vice-verca. As I completed the test for one Linux video editing software, I wrote it down and ranked it based on my experiences.


I am getting a bit sick of comments like this. Use BLENDER 3D!!!!!!!! It does not crash, it is powerful and it has more features than anything that you could pay for. How many programs out there can do camera tracking? Inserting animanton into your film using camera tracking? Complex fades that interack with your own art work? Plus of course all the basics. Be sure to watch the new film coming out that is made by the Blender foundation using almost nothing but blender. It is called Tears of Steal and should be out soon! (late August 2012)


Look at the screenshot I attached above. I want you to look at the left sidebar. The #01 “Getting Started” video is what I just walked you through. You can see there are more video instructions. The videos are between 2 and 5 minutes long each, so it doesn’t take long at all to become acquainted with the software. The 5 additional training videos include the following topics.
×