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I’ve had good luck with Lives. I’ve been able to accomplish things with it that I couldn’t figure out how to do with the others. My main use of video is for web sites. I’ve even created a video sequence from a JPEG still which I then manipulated with Lives tools and output as an animated GIF. I further tune the size of the animation in GIMP which allowed me adjust the the frame rate on a per frame basis.

5.1 Termination: Without prejudice to any other rights, Noble Samurai or You may terminate this Agreement at any time. Upon termination, (a) all licenses and rights to the Noble Samurai Software shall immediately terminate; (b) You will immediately cease any and all use of the Noble Samurai Software and services; and (c) You will immediately remove the Noble Samurai Software from all hard drives, networks and other storage media and destroy all copies of the Noble Samurai Software in Your possession or under Your control.
Pitivi has been around for a few years too. This video editor for Linux is a GNOME application and is designed to fit into the GNOME desktop. (I assume it will work just fine in KDE or XFCE too.) Installing it requires the use of Flatpak, but they give rather easy-to-use instructions on the Pitivi website, and I had no problems at all. Drag-and-drop seems to be well supported, and it first transcodes videos before they can be used, which takes a few minutes or seconds, depending on the size of each. But it appears the videos can still be used during this process.
I’ve twiddled around with a few of the programs mentioned here but they all seem horrifically counter-intuitive. That is to say, I could not figure them out. (and I have the strong motivation of a soccer team clamoring for their annual ‘best of’ movie.) Windows might be f#2%ed, but Apple is downright frightening these days. Free is more and more the only way to go.
 Linux gets my pick as the best multi-media production platform because it is flexible, efficient, and secure. Your system resources are going to your work, rather than in supporting a bloaty operating system further bogged down by marginally-effective anti-malware software. In our previous installment we covered a range of excellent drawing and painting, photography, 3D rendering, and desktop publishing applications for Linux. And my favorite Linux distros for serious multi-media production.
Ya know, I have to chime in here. I am using Ubuntu. I love it but what I don’t love is the attitude of some of the Ubuntu techies. I am not a programmer but I am far from computer illiterate, in fact, over the weekend I was in the company of a computer programmer who complimented me on my knowledge…self-taught at that. I like the challenge of Ubuntu but sometimes you just need a question answered that will help you move on to your next phase of research. I sometimes spend weeks…WEEKS, researching a problem before I ask a question. And that is not a complaint…I like doing the research. What I don’t like are the snotty responses you sometimes get from the techies…almost as bad as Mac lovers. So I have learned not to bother with the Ubuntu support sites so much and just do general research on the ‘net , like YouTube (where I have found many of my answers, thank you). On the one hand…it’s too bad some of the attitudes are so cheeky. On the other hand, I learn a lot.

first time comments,been using linux now for about 3 years and boy have i learned a lot.mostly into making movies and iam always looking for better and easier software.self taught,trial and error but hard knocks teaches us how to help ourselves and others.not throwing any stones,about the easiest program is ubuntu,set-up with devede,google chrome,vlc,k3b,k9 copy,deluge,ktorrent,transmission,and so far have bee n able to do everything i need to do.always trying to better myself so iam going to try cinnelera.good luck to all. s sparkey
This video editor has the ability to move things in the visual space straight in the viewer panel compared to the others where you need to change some value of x or y to scale or move things in your composition. This might not matter much in many cases but if you have a lot of elements moving or scaling throughout your scene, this is the fastest and a much more intuitive method than having to adjust the scale/position values of individual axes separately. This again is a big reason why I prefer an alpha (a damn good alpha) version of this software than a stable release of Kdenlive. See More
You’re missing the point; ‘nix has its place. Our servers run on it. My netbook runs it. My web development is done on it. Our databases run on it. But I don’t have time to “try” this bit of software or that software for video editing in the hope that it will provide the magic bullet. In any case, as I have stated elsewhere, every video editing program I have tried on linux has one or more severe failings in respect of the things I need to do. Attempts at creating robust video editing software on linux are, IMO, amateurish.
Paul, this is the biggest problem with getting linux accepted. “If you can’t figure it out, theres always fisher price.” that attitude makes people who are having difficulty turn back to other operating systems. Not everyone out there is a computer geek, many have no clue about terminal or how to find and install software. Windows has wizards, with Linux, sometimes you need to be a wizard. So lighten-up and remember that people will judge linux by the people they meet. Be an ambassador for the movement, not an ass.

Avidemux is a free, open source video editing software designed mainly for simple cutting, splitting, merging, filtering and encoding, etc. It is a cross-platform free video editing software and support various file formats with different codecs such as AVI, MPEG, MP4, ASF, etc. With it, you can easily edit your videos and output the edited videos for your iPhone, iPad, iPod, PSP, etc.
The only criticism I might have for Kdenlive is that it looks like an open source program. It isn’t the most user-friendly application to work with and appears to have been programmed by someone who knows what they are doing but expects you to also know what they are doing. It isn’t the most polished experience, and some things seem to be a bit obtuse to do.

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