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Cinelarra has two versions: the unsupported community version and a commercial edition. Every six months the nice Cinelarra developers release the latest source code. It’s not widely available in the usual distro repositories, but the good Cinelerra-CV folks bundle it up into Arch, Debian, Fedora, Ubuntu, and other distro packages. There is a Cinelarra PPA— Personal Package Archive– for Ubuntu users. PPAs are user-supported repositories for specific applications, like Cinelarra. They’re not official repos, but they allow you to use your normal Ubuntu package manager to install and remove third-party software.
I’ve had good luck with Lives. I’ve been able to accomplish things with it that I couldn’t figure out how to do with the others. My main use of video is for web sites. I’ve even created a video sequence from a JPEG still which I then manipulated with Lives tools and output as an animated GIF. I further tune the size of the animation in GIMP which allowed me adjust the the frame rate on a per frame basis.
Nevertheless, when you find the elusive, easy to use video editing software that has the features I mention, that doesn't crash, or at least when it does crash recovers files the user was working on, that doesn't need constant tweaking using the shell, that has reasonable, non obfuscated documentation in understandable english, please let me know. I will buy you a beer and the software without hesitation.
Pitivi is a Non linear video editor and also open source software that freely available. For intuitive video editing this software is designed. It supports simple features i.e. snapping, trimming, splitting, and clips cutting. Pitivi curves system supports audio mixing feature. It has the ability to use the keyboard shortcuts and scrubbers. In this video and audio can be linked together and this is a great advantage of it. It is the first open source video editor that support the MEF- material exchange format. Pritivi's user friendly interface gives drag and drop, direct manipulation, reducing complexity and native theme navigation. This software can be translated into several languages. It has also a user manual support.

Pitivi is a Non linear video editor and also open source software that freely available. For intuitive video editing this software is designed. It supports simple features i.e. snapping, trimming, splitting, and clips cutting. Pitivi curves system supports audio mixing feature. It has the ability to use the keyboard shortcuts and scrubbers. In this video and audio can be linked together and this is a great advantage of it. It is the first open source video editor that support the MEF- material exchange format. Pritivi's user friendly interface gives drag and drop, direct manipulation, reducing complexity and native theme navigation. This software can be translated into several languages. It has also a user manual support.
After experiencing various crashes (on Ubuntu 9.04) with Avidemux, LiVES, and Kino, I switched to Cinelerracv. I had avoided switching becasue it was a bit intimidating at first. Then I discovered the tutorials atAkirad, and with some effort, have mastered its capabilities. Combined with FFMPEG (and a neat little GUIfor it called WinFF) and Audacity for specialized audio work, I have a suite that can do whatever I want and produce it in whatever format I desire. Thanks for the reviews. They provide a great path for investigation…
People who dislike Linux usually say that it’s not great for professional, high quality video production and as a result the industry ignores it and doesn’t take it seriously. This isn’t entirely true.  It is very much a fact that Apple Computer will never release Final Cut Pro for Ubuntu, and Adobe will never make a FlatPak version of Premiere, but it doesn’t matter. Some commercial, professional video editing tools do find their way onto Linux.
Pierre and Megan, you’ve been trolling these comments for two full years, now. I can see, after carefully reading all of the commentary and the thought behind each of them, that you both are only here to troll and discourage. Neither of you have offered any real concrete proof of anything, and you’ve used smoke and mirrors to try to defend merely what are empty opinions. After two full years of trolling this particular page it’s about time you both got told to get a life.
7.3 No waiver: The failure to exercise, or delay in exercising, a right, power or remedy provided to Noble Samurai by this Agreement or by law shall not constitute a waiver of that right, power or remedy. If Noble Samurai waives a breach of any provision of this Agreement this shall not operate as a waiver of a subsequent breach of that provision, or as a waiver of a breach of any other provision.
You’re missing the point; ‘nix has its place. Our servers run on it. My netbook runs it. My web development is done on it. Our databases run on it. But I don’t have time to “try” this bit of software or that software for video editing in the hope that it will provide the magic bullet. In any case, as I have stated elsewhere, every video editing program I have tried on linux has one or more severe failings in respect of the things I need to do. Attempts at creating robust video editing software on linux are, IMO, amateurish.
People who dislike Linux usually say that it’s not great for professional, high quality video production and as a result the industry ignores it and doesn’t take it seriously. This isn’t entirely true.  It is very much a fact that Apple Computer will never release Final Cut Pro for Ubuntu, and Adobe will never make a FlatPak version of Premiere, but it doesn’t matter. Some commercial, professional video editing tools do find their way onto Linux.
The ubiquitous Kdenlive strikes again. It has been around for years and is used by many people. I tried to use it a few months ago, but it was completely unusable. It often didn’t start, and when it did, it crashed and refused to export properly. However, for this article, I installed the latest version from the Kdenlive PPA and tried it out. Things have changed. Oh my, how things have changed.
By far, this is the most professional video editor for Linux available in the market. DaVinci Resolve is a powerful video editor and is commonly used by cinema production houses all over Hollywood. It comes with amazing features such as editing, professional audio post-production, and color correction, enabling professionals to create TV-shows and even movies.
Crash, crash, crash... when it didn't crash I found it to be in that middle zone of more than a basic editor, but not a professional one... features are not very intuitive. It took me more than 30 minutes of randomly clicking to figure out how to adjust the effects applied to a clip and then I was underwhelmed with the options. To be fair... I was looking for something specific when I tried this out. I've used Adobe and other video editors in the past and this just missed my current needs and my expectations based on past experiences. See More
Latest version of Vivia was launched in 2008. This highly user friendly free video editor is not only made for Linux but is also appropraite for windows. The Vivia is an easy to handle video editor which is free for both personal as well as commercial purpose. Vivia ensures easy and simple non linear editings and real time transitions on a friendly interface. It also supports multi camera feature on which clips obtained simultaneously from different cameras can also be edited.

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