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Right now there is one really serious competitor coming out with it’s brand new open source non linear video editing product. I am talking about Lightworks` Oscar winnig Editshare which has been released open source last year. Feel free to discover their website http://www.lightworksbeta.com/ and tons of professional features it has. Yes this is not intended for video editing noobies but this is going to become a really brilliant piece of software for Lin/Mac/Win. Right now only Win version is accessible but:
With this editor, users will get numerous titles and transitions, support for most video and image formats. You also get a fantastic export feature that lets you export files in various formats. As previously mentioned, the software caters to the demands of novice learners; expert users need not be disappointed; it provides support for professional video formats such as 4K.
The most promising or also often called best Linux free video editor of all, OpenShot has a long history of development and should be mature and stable. I downloaded the latest Openshot from its PPA since the one in the main Ubuntu repositories is, rather perplexingly, a very old and outdated version. Once OpenShot is opened, it appears very easy to use. The default layout is simple and intuitive, and there are even hints that pop up the first time you use it! I drag-and-dropped a few videos I had taken in preparation for this post, and boy, was I disappointed with this so-called best Linux video editing software.
Latest version of Vivia was launched in 2008. This highly user friendly free video editor is not only made for Linux but is also appropraite for windows. The Vivia is an easy to handle video editor which is free for both personal as well as commercial purpose. Vivia ensures easy and simple non linear editings and real time transitions on a friendly interface. It also supports multi camera feature on which clips obtained simultaneously from different cameras can also be edited.
Kino always seems to be neglected when people are discussing Linux video editing. Perhaps it is considered too basic? I’ve found it superb for simple editing, adding titles, etc of youtube clips and home video. The interface is very intuitive and easy to grasp for the casual video editor. I am sure kdenlive would be a better program but it crashes every time I have ever tried it. I just downloaded latest version now Feb 2010 and crashed within 20 secs of using it. Tried latest pitivi just now also and locked up immediately. Kino is reliable, reasonably attractive, and does the basic job well.
 Linux gets my pick as the best multi-media production platform because it is flexible, efficient, and secure. Your system resources are going to your work, rather than in supporting a bloaty operating system further bogged down by marginally-effective anti-malware software. In our previous installment we covered a range of excellent drawing and painting, photography, 3D rendering, and desktop publishing applications for Linux. And my favorite Linux distros for serious multi-media production.
This video editing software offers customizable layout support, a clip list, a multi-track timeline, automatic backup, keyframe special effects, and transitions. Are you using any unique file format or camcorder? Not a problem — Kdenlive supports almost everything available. It should also be mentioned Kdenlive supports Mac OSX and FreeBSD as well. Another important feature is the Proxy editing. This cool feature can automatically create low-resolution copies of your source clips to allow light-weight editing, and then render using full resolution.
With this editor, users will get numerous titles and transitions, support for most video and image formats. You also get a fantastic export feature that lets you export files in various formats. As previously mentioned, the software caters to the demands of novice learners; expert users need not be disappointed; it provides support for professional video formats such as 4K.
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That was the first video editing software package I bought for making home movies. It was easy to use, intuitive even, although some bits were a bit clunky. After making 20 or so coasters, it turned out to be near impossible to burn DVDs. Going online I discovered that burning DVDs was a common problem that upgrading wouldn’t help so I bought Vegas. Since my goal is primarily making home movies for distribution to a far flung computer illiterate family (and that isn’t even just the octegenarians) this is important.

In this article, I have tried to generic list some best Ubuntu Video Editing Software. But this does not end. There is a lot of Video Editing Software available for Ubuntu. The media editing tools which I mentioned in this article will be great for you. All works well. You can try your best one. Don’t forget to share it with your friends and family. Thank you very much.

Ankush Das a.k.a. CEO_&[email protected](.in), is a very energetic person who always puts up an evil smile to counter any obstacle in his way. This dude is highly unpredictable and in fact, you can’t know what’s coming from him… be it his articles, generating an aura, or his personality. Here, he mostly covers stuff on the most popular mobile operating system (Android).
After briefly testing all the various open-source video editors I could find easily available for fedora 13, I came to the conclusion that kdenlive was the best fit. By and large most of the editors were plain unusable for more than 5 minutes or just had too many limitations. kdenlive has its own faults, including that its documentation is not always clear and one must refer to it constantly when figuring out the UI (hint: video tutorials were so useful to understanding the docs). Essentially, I can now do almost anything I need to with kdenlive now, but I would greatly appreciate it if the devs could improve rendering time, update the dvd creation wizard to support blu-ray, and add more rendering options (for example, ogv output does not support quality levels, only bitrates). As for stability, I saw several crashes when I was first exploring features, but none since.
Whether you’re cutting a feature or just editing a short or two or even a youtube video, having an NLE that you don’t have to wonder about (whether it’s going to just slowly fall apart) is preferable. What is the basic stuff most people use? I’m a rather accomplished editor and I find that even for the simplest projects I tend to use advanced techniques. However, that doesn’t stop me hoping that someday someone is going to create an NLE for Linux (commercial or not) so that I can make the switch full time. Because I love the command line and I love the free part, and I like being part of the friendly community…the more time I can spend hacking wifi the better.

LiVES is a free video editor developed for Linux operating system. It has a blend of real-time video performance and non-linear editing. It enables users to edit and make videos without worrying about the video formats, rates, frame sized, etc. Furthermore, it also performs as a Video Jockey software because of its multitrack timelines, mixing of clips and switching.
A non-linear editing system (NLE) is a video editing (NLVE) or audio editing (NLAE) system which can provide editing method for video clips or frams. You will be able to access any frame in a video clip. Non-linear editing is done for film and television post-production. However, the cost of editing system gone down and non-linear editing tools (including software) are now within the reach of most home users.
Blender 2.8 makes video editing a LOT easier (start UI, easy to drag file, left click select...). It's still a bit harder to learn than other tools but for power users each shortcut you'll learn can be applied almost everywhere (e.g. pressing "i" on a numeric field to keyframe the value, or "g" to grab and move and element...). It's very powerful especially if you want to also include 3D in your videos. However many standard tasks will take more time in Blender: The preview is slow, to do a high quality zoom in animation you may need to use a Compositor or instead crop, rendering in 10 bits requires a lot of temporary disk storage, video stabilization is also a pain... Overall I'd suggest it more for someone interested in 3D doing also video editing. See More
Nevertheless, when you find the elusive, easy to use video editing software that has the features I mention, that doesn't crash, or at least when it does crash recovers files the user was working on, that doesn't need constant tweaking using the shell, that has reasonable, non obfuscated documentation in understandable english, please let me know. I will buy you a beer and the software without hesitation.
A non-linear editing system (NLE) is a video editing (NLVE) or audio editing (NLAE) system which can provide editing method for video clips or frams. You will be able to access any frame in a video clip. Non-linear editing is done for film and television post-production. However, the cost of editing system gone down and non-linear editing tools (including software) are now within the reach of most home users.
You’re missing the point; ‘nix has its place. Our servers run on it. My netbook runs it. My web development is done on it. Our databases run on it. But I don’t have time to “try” this bit of software or that software for video editing in the hope that it will provide the magic bullet. In any case, as I have stated elsewhere, every video editing program I have tried on linux has one or more severe failings in respect of the things I need to do. Attempts at creating robust video editing software on linux are, IMO, amateurish.
Pitivi is a non-linear video editor for Linux with “a beautiful and intuitive user interface”. Unlike a lot of other video editors on Linux, the Pitivi editor takes into account that users all have different skill-sets when it comes to working on video projects. As a result, it gives the user many different ways of manipulating the project timeline via different timeline views.
Introducing Lightworks, it’s a commercial video editing suite for Linux, Mac and Windows. It’s a non-linear tool with a completely different approach to editing video. Instead of a simple GTK or Qt window that is manipulated by the desktop environment (and themed by it too), the app offers up a full screen editing environment. Lightworks isn’t free. In fact, unlike the other apps on this list it actually requires a monthly subscription to use but it’s worth it if you want to edit and produce video on Linux.
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