c

Cinelerra *had* the most promise and it’s probably good if you want to run a TV station. However, it’s not creative at all. Simple edits are easy. However, anything else can become a stunt. IMO, Kdenlive has seen the quickest growth. Lives is also doing well. In the next few years we may see those apps grow into the free alternative of Finalcut – but not Cinelerra. It does what it does, and there is no need to change.
After briefly testing all the various open-source video editors I could find easily available for fedora 13, I came to the conclusion that kdenlive was the best fit. By and large most of the editors were plain unusable for more than 5 minutes or just had too many limitations. kdenlive has its own faults, including that its documentation is not always clear and one must refer to it constantly when figuring out the UI (hint: video tutorials were so useful to understanding the docs). Essentially, I can now do almost anything I need to with kdenlive now, but I would greatly appreciate it if the devs could improve rendering time, update the dvd creation wizard to support blu-ray, and add more rendering options (for example, ogv output does not support quality levels, only bitrates). As for stability, I saw several crashes when I was first exploring features, but none since.
That was the first video editing software package I bought for making home movies. It was easy to use, intuitive even, although some bits were a bit clunky. After making 20 or so coasters, it turned out to be near impossible to burn DVDs. Going online I discovered that burning DVDs was a common problem that upgrading wouldn’t help so I bought Vegas. Since my goal is primarily making home movies for distribution to a far flung computer illiterate family (and that isn’t even just the octegenarians) this is important.
In this article, I have tried to generic list some best Ubuntu Video Editing Software. But this does not end. There is a lot of Video Editing Software available for Ubuntu. The media editing tools which I mentioned in this article will be great for you. All works well. You can try your best one. Don’t forget to share it with your friends and family. Thank you very much.

Not knowing what you need it to do, it is hard to comment but it is very easy to use just for movies. You just open up the track you need and position it on the timeline thingy. You then put the next track on the next line. You can then add blends or whatever you want and you can edit each track right there in the viewer. When you are done just render it out. It is true that this bit of blender is just a small bit in a very big program but if you focus on just this little bit you can learn it in a few minutes.
Pitivi is a non-linear video editor for Linux with “a beautiful and intuitive user interface”. Unlike a lot of other video editors on Linux, the Pitivi editor takes into account that users all have different skill-sets when it comes to working on video projects. As a result, it gives the user many different ways of manipulating the project timeline via different timeline views.
4.1 Payment: You will pay all fees or charges to your account based on Noble Samurai’s payment terms. If you are purchasing software by Noble Samurai on a subscription model, you may be required to provide Noble Samurai with a valid credit card as a condition to signing up for an account. You are responsible for paying any taxes that may apply and will ensure that the nominated credit card account is valid and has available credit to enable scheduled payments to be withdrawn by Noble Samurai. If you do not pay on time or if Noble Samurai cannot charge your credit card for any reason, Noble Samurai reserves the right to either suspend or terminate your access to the Noble Samurai Software and/or the services and account and terminate this Agreement. If you have a balance due on any account, you agree that Noble Samurai may charge such unpaid fees to your credit card.
Whether you’re a professional video editor looking to get some serious work done, or a regular person looking to make a quick slide show, we’ll help you find the best tool for the job. All of the video editors we cover in this list can be found in most Linux distribution’s software repositories. To install any of them, just open your package manager, search and install. Alternatively, visit the websites linked to install them.
Ya know, I have to chime in here. I am using Ubuntu. I love it but what I don’t love is the attitude of some of the Ubuntu techies. I am not a programmer but I am far from computer illiterate, in fact, over the weekend I was in the company of a computer programmer who complimented me on my knowledge…self-taught at that. I like the challenge of Ubuntu but sometimes you just need a question answered that will help you move on to your next phase of research. I sometimes spend weeks…WEEKS, researching a problem before I ask a question. And that is not a complaint…I like doing the research. What I don’t like are the snotty responses you sometimes get from the techies…almost as bad as Mac lovers. So I have learned not to bother with the Ubuntu support sites so much and just do general research on the ‘net , like YouTube (where I have found many of my answers, thank you). On the one hand…it’s too bad some of the attitudes are so cheeky. On the other hand, I learn a lot.
There are no other legitimate operating systems. Even the international space station had to go all Linux for the sack of performance, reliability and stability. The problem with the world is laziness. we need to learn our tech to protect us from crooks in power. Tech is here to stay people. Time to roll up your sleeves. You will be happy you did. Just take it a baby-step at a time. Back up and don’t worry about reinstalling.
The problem average people have with Cinelerra is that it is truly complicated and requires time spent learning about the real underpinnings of video production technology in order to use it to its full potential. But the learning is worth it. What a person learns by digging deep into the intricacies of video production will allow a deeper understanding of what is going on with even “hand-holding” software.
An excellent guide and resources for anyone trying to start editing, and publishing videos. I have used few of these to achieve my video. I use Kino to capture, sometimes Kdenlive to slice( No I know how to do it in cinelerra), and finaly use the cinelerra for the rest of the editing, up to encoding. if they asked me what I wish for for my birthday, I would wish for the Kdenlive to be as powerfull as cinelerra, as it is so logical and easy to use. To me most are buggy, but at the end I managed to edit, and put my composition on Youtube. Check it out. ItÅ› all been done with Linux.
Cinelarra has two versions: the unsupported community version and a commercial edition. Every six months the nice Cinelarra developers release the latest source code. It’s not widely available in the usual distro repositories, but the good Cinelerra-CV folks bundle it up into Arch, Debian, Fedora, Ubuntu, and other distro packages. There is a Cinelarra PPA— Personal Package Archive– for Ubuntu users. PPAs are user-supported repositories for specific applications, like Cinelarra. They’re not official repos, but they allow you to use your normal Ubuntu package manager to install and remove third-party software.
Far from the “it just works” dream, this program just does not work. I have a relatively fast i7 laptop with plenty of RAM, but OpenShot slowed my entire system to a crawl as soon as I started to edit some video. Firefox became unresponsive and OpenShot crashed or at least appeared to do so since a crash report window opened but OpenShot did not close.
Latest version of Vivia was launched in 2008. This highly user friendly free video editor is not only made for Linux but is also appropraite for windows. The Vivia is an easy to handle video editor which is free for both personal as well as commercial purpose. Vivia ensures easy and simple non linear editings and real time transitions on a friendly interface. It also supports multi camera feature on which clips obtained simultaneously from different cameras can also be edited.

3.1 No Warranties: Using Content Samurai assists You to rapidly convert written content into videos. As part of this software, Noble Samurai facilitates access to images found in Google and Flickr with a Creative Common License. In order to ensure You comply with the Creative Common License terms, Noble Samurai will take reasonable measures to provide the attribution details available for the image chosen which should then be included by You in Your video description or blogpost. Noble Samurai cannot guarantee nor provides any warranties that the attribution details provided are accurate nor that the images available within Content Samurai software are able to be used under Creative Common License. In addition, Noble Samurai cannot guarantee that You will be able to access data, information or services from or upload to any third party nor that any data, information or services from any third party can be obtained or uploaded to without disruptions or delays. Noble Samurai cannot make any guarantees or warranties as to the effectiveness or reliability of any services provided by a third party, or the reliability and the performance of or the suitability of the information provided by the Noble Samurai Software.

Nevertheless, when you find the elusive, easy to use video editing software that has the features I mention, that doesn't crash, or at least when it does crash recovers files the user was working on, that doesn't need constant tweaking using the shell, that has reasonable, non obfuscated documentation in understandable english, please let me know. I will buy you a beer and the software without hesitation.


Last 5 years of my 7 years Linux experience I was regularly challenged by day-to-day video editing tasks. Main content was 720p/1080i/1080p in ts/m2ts/mp4/mov. The most useful instruments that produced a really nice results was combination of avidemux, kdenlive and VirtualDub (under Wine). As per my experience you are able to get excellent results with those tools but the problem is workflow really uncertain and not stable sometimes. Lack of features also has place. But the situation changes. Right now Kdenlive project is really nice. It has tons of features and stable enough for relatively serious editing/finishing. I am sure this won’t be too hard for any person interested to learn Kdenlive workflow. Otherwise this person is too lazy for Linux in general. You may find plenty of video lessons on ytube/vimeo.
I use Blender 3d for most of my video editing. You can do things with it that you would not beleave! Problem is that Blender3d is its own world and learning it takes time. It is something for a pro with some 3d modeling skills or a normal person that can read and is willing to learn the GUI. Wait for Blender 3D 2.5 to come out. It has an all new interface and new improved work flows! Should be out in a month or two…

You’re missing the point; ‘nix has its place. Our servers run on it. My netbook runs it. My web development is done on it. Our databases run on it. But I don’t have time to “try” this bit of software or that software for video editing in the hope that it will provide the magic bullet. In any case, as I have stated elsewhere, every video editing program I have tried on linux has one or more severe failings in respect of the things I need to do. Attempts at creating robust video editing software on linux are, IMO, amateurish.

The Cinelerra entry needs updating. Not only does the provided install link not work, the separate branch GG Infinity supports 8 Linux distros and provides instructions to auto-update every month (see https://www.cinelerra-gg.org/downloads/). If the different branches are confusing, visit https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinelerra which will clarify it.
I’ve used video editing software in Windows, and there is *nothing* intuitive about it. All of the software programs I’ve used are so loaded with DRM that trying to burn your home movies to DVD is a an adventure, often in futility. One of the commercial “home use” software package I bought was fairly intuitive, but the DRM made it incapable of burning DVDs. My prime reason for wanting to be able to video edit is so I can put together home movie compilations for all the computer illiterates and senior citizens in my family. They watch movies on TV and can just about handle popping a DVD in. I’m tired of having some of my homemade DVDs work in Dad’s machine, but then refusing to play in my sister’s.
LiVES is a free video editor developed for Linux operating system. It has a blend of real-time video performance and non-linear editing. It enables users to edit and make videos without worrying about the video formats, rates, frame sized, etc. Furthermore, it also performs as a Video Jockey software because of its multitrack timelines, mixing of clips and switching.
i want a good program that is good for making amvs (animated music videos) basically editing clips, adding effects and audio, which i am sure that most if not all video editing software does. from what i read here if i really want to go advanced i could use blender but i tried blender (for 3d modeling only though) and its quite hard. i will try it again and learn in but i am looking for something a bit simpler yet with lots of good effects. which one on this list (or not on the list) is good for a beginner. i have used Windows Live Movie Maker which is pretty simple and i know my way around it ok, maybe there are some features in it i don’t know about but i know a decent amount about it. maybe i would like something a bit more advanced but not too advanced.

I’m so pleased with this software that I have been paying a monthly membership fee ever since my free trial expired. I use Content Samurai for YouTube affiliate marketing. You can too. Just add a link to your affiliate offers in your video descriptions. I also turn plr articles into videos. That’s right, I don’t have to write anything. I just create videos from plr content.
×