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 Linux gets my pick as the best multi-media production platform because it is flexible, efficient, and secure. Your system resources are going to your work, rather than in supporting a bloaty operating system further bogged down by marginally-effective anti-malware software. In our previous installment we covered a range of excellent drawing and painting, photography, 3D rendering, and desktop publishing applications for Linux. And my favorite Linux distros for serious multi-media production.


Not exactly going to be a long term con. The official website clearly states the same, which is why this piece of software should not be used for important projects. Then again it is so damn good that Olive editor is right now my primary editor for most projects. The fact that there is NO stable version of this software does bother a bit as it's ability to handle complex projects is almost unpredictable. But all said and done, it's still not crashed on me even once. Even though an alpha, the best damn alpha release ever. See More

Looking to quickly edit a video on Linux? Consider using Shotcut. It’s a non-linear, cross-platform, multi-track video editing tool that is great and easy to use. The video editor has support for adding titles, cutting and splicing clips together, as well as keyframe options, and more. It’s certainly not as complex as something like Lightworks, or as user-friendly as OpenShot, but it’s a solid editor that can get the job done. If you’re looking for a competent video editing tool, Shotcut might be a great choice.
Kino always seems to be neglected when people are discussing Linux video editing. Perhaps it is considered too basic? I’ve found it superb for simple editing, adding titles, etc of youtube clips and home video. The interface is very intuitive and easy to grasp for the casual video editor. I am sure kdenlive would be a better program but it crashes every time I have ever tried it. I just downloaded latest version now Feb 2010 and crashed within 20 secs of using it. Tried latest pitivi just now also and locked up immediately. Kino is reliable, reasonably attractive, and does the basic job well.
The latest version of DaVinci Resolve features a dual timeline that allows users to quickly navigate the whole edit and trim without zooming and scrolling. There’s also a brand-new video editing engine that leverages machine learning to enable features such as facial recognition, speed warp, and others. All in all, DaVinci Resolve shows just how far Linux video editors have come over the years.

That said, I am also long time ‘nix user (from before we had the GUI) and other OS. Linux has its place but fast video editing isn’t one of them. My office needs to edit about 3 hours of video every day, splicing together the scenes from two fixed cameras. There is some Linux software that might do it, but it is just too slow, awkward and buggy to use. We use Womble’s DVD Wizard software on Windows on that. It’s not expensive, good support and very fast to use even on lower spec hardware.

Audio and video clips can be linked together and managed as single clip. Another thing that I personally find useful is that Pitivi can be used in different languages and has a very extended documentation. Learning how to use this software is easy and doesn’t require much time. Once you get used to it, you will be able to edit video and audio files with high precision.
This tool is way ahead of the current OpenSource alternatives. Whilst Blender is a 3D tool with a video editor, this is a video editor with a 3D modeler and it does video editing very well. Motion stabilization, transitions, color grading... all shine. If you don't mind using a closed source application, this is the best free (and possibly non-free) video editor as of 2019. See More

The Cinelerra entry needs updating. Not only does the provided install link not work, the separate branch GG Infinity supports 8 Linux distros and provides instructions to auto-update every month (see https://www.cinelerra-gg.org/downloads/). If the different branches are confusing, visit https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinelerra which will clarify it.

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Nevertheless, when you find the elusive, easy to use video editing software that has the features I mention, that doesn't crash, or at least when it does crash recovers files the user was working on, that doesn't need constant tweaking using the shell, that has reasonable, non obfuscated documentation in understandable english, please let me know. I will buy you a beer and the software without hesitation.
The ubiquitous Kdenlive strikes again. It has been around for years and is used by many people. I tried to use it a few months ago, but it was completely unusable. It often didn’t start, and when it did, it crashed and refused to export properly. However, for this article, I installed the latest version from the Kdenlive PPA and tried it out. Things have changed. Oh my, how things have changed.
 Linux gets my pick as the best multi-media production platform because it is flexible, efficient, and secure. Your system resources are going to your work, rather than in supporting a bloaty operating system further bogged down by marginally-effective anti-malware software. In our previous installment we covered a range of excellent drawing and painting, photography, 3D rendering, and desktop publishing applications for Linux. And my favorite Linux distros for serious multi-media production.
Pitivi is a non-linear video editor for Linux with “a beautiful and intuitive user interface”. Unlike a lot of other video editors on Linux, the Pitivi editor takes into account that users all have different skill-sets when it comes to working on video projects. As a result, it gives the user many different ways of manipulating the project timeline via different timeline views.
Paul, this is the biggest problem with getting linux accepted. “If you can’t figure it out, theres always fisher price.” that attitude makes people who are having difficulty turn back to other operating systems. Not everyone out there is a computer geek, many have no clue about terminal or how to find and install software. Windows has wizards, with Linux, sometimes you need to be a wizard. So lighten-up and remember that people will judge linux by the people they meet. Be an ambassador for the movement, not an ass.
You’re missing the point; ‘nix has its place. Our servers run on it. My netbook runs it. My web development is done on it. Our databases run on it. But I don’t have time to “try” this bit of software or that software for video editing in the hope that it will provide the magic bullet. In any case, as I have stated elsewhere, every video editing program I have tried on linux has one or more severe failings in respect of the things I need to do. Attempts at creating robust video editing software on linux are, IMO, amateurish.
Open Shot is a video editor for Linux operating system written Python. It is open source video editing software and also freely available. It main features to support many audio, video and image formats. Better drag and drop feature. In open shot cutting, trimming, snapping and cropping are easier. It also supports video transition, compositing, 3d effects and motion picture credits. Open shot is user friendly software that gives also support of animation of key frame, easier encoding of video, digital zooming, editing and mixing of audio and digital video effects. This video editor software provides compositing and mainly extensive editing tool for practical working on high-definition video with HDV and AVCHD.
first time comments,been using linux now for about 3 years and boy have i learned a lot.mostly into making movies and iam always looking for better and easier software.self taught,trial and error but hard knocks teaches us how to help ourselves and others.not throwing any stones,about the easiest program is ubuntu,set-up with devede,google chrome,vlc,k3b,k9 copy,deluge,ktorrent,transmission,and so far have bee n able to do everything i need to do.always trying to better myself so iam going to try cinnelera.good luck to all. s sparkey
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Last 5 years of my 7 years Linux experience I was regularly challenged by day-to-day video editing tasks. Main content was 720p/1080i/1080p in ts/m2ts/mp4/mov. The most useful instruments that produced a really nice results was combination of avidemux, kdenlive and VirtualDub (under Wine). As per my experience you are able to get excellent results with those tools but the problem is workflow really uncertain and not stable sometimes. Lack of features also has place. But the situation changes. Right now Kdenlive project is really nice. It has tons of features and stable enough for relatively serious editing/finishing. I am sure this won’t be too hard for any person interested to learn Kdenlive workflow. Otherwise this person is too lazy for Linux in general. You may find plenty of video lessons on ytube/vimeo.
Coming from a film editing background I *know* how to edit, it’s just the tools I need to master. It should not be that hard. What’s finally pushed me over the edge is that the windows codec is broken (I have the worst lemon version of XP you can imagine) so that I can’t even see the images for the thousands of hours of video I have recorded with my Canon camera in the premium video editing software available for Windows But I can’t replace the codec because Windows thinks it works, so it won’t reinstall. Which is too bad because I slaved to learn that bloody commercial editing software that cost a bomb and got quite good at it. But intuitive? No way, Pierre.
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Fanboi nonsense. There are many reasonably priced software packages out there that will do all and more than most folks want and need. We need to edit videos from two 1080p fixed point camera sources on a daily basis. The package we use costs less than $100 and puts many of the so called “professional” systems to absolute shame. Regrettably it’s WIndows only, but if it works, use it.

Latest version of Vivia was launched in 2008. This highly user friendly free video editor is not only made for Linux but is also appropraite for windows. The Vivia is an easy to handle video editor which is free for both personal as well as commercial purpose. Vivia ensures easy and simple non linear editings and real time transitions on a friendly interface. It also supports multi camera feature on which clips obtained simultaneously from different cameras can also be edited.
The latest version of DaVinci Resolve features a dual timeline that allows users to quickly navigate the whole edit and trim without zooming and scrolling. There’s also a brand-new video editing engine that leverages machine learning to enable features such as facial recognition, speed warp, and others. All in all, DaVinci Resolve shows just how far Linux video editors have come over the years.
Content Samurai promises that you can “Create Stunning Videos Fast” with their app. You can use Content Samurai video creation software to turn articles, blog posts and shorter pieces of content into videos in minutes, or so the creators claim. I’ve spent a lot of money having freelancers create videos for me, so I figured I would give Content Samurai a shot.
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