c

You’re missing the point; ‘nix has its place. Our servers run on it. My netbook runs it. My web development is done on it. Our databases run on it. But I don’t have time to “try” this bit of software or that software for video editing in the hope that it will provide the magic bullet. In any case, as I have stated elsewhere, every video editing program I have tried on linux has one or more severe failings in respect of the things I need to do. Attempts at creating robust video editing software on linux are, IMO, amateurish.
Last 5 years of my 7 years Linux experience I was regularly challenged by day-to-day video editing tasks. Main content was 720p/1080i/1080p in ts/m2ts/mp4/mov. The most useful instruments that produced a really nice results was combination of avidemux, kdenlive and VirtualDub (under Wine). As per my experience you are able to get excellent results with those tools but the problem is workflow really uncertain and not stable sometimes. Lack of features also has place. But the situation changes. Right now Kdenlive project is really nice. It has tons of features and stable enough for relatively serious editing/finishing. I am sure this won’t be too hard for any person interested to learn Kdenlive workflow. Otherwise this person is too lazy for Linux in general. You may find plenty of video lessons on ytube/vimeo.
Pitivi could be described as the Linux alternative to Windows Movie Maker. Both video editors have a clear user interface that doesn’t present its users with a steep learning curve, and both are intended to help regular people express themselves through videomaking. Of course, Windows Movie Maker is no longer in development, whereas Pitivi is developed by a fantastic community of people who believe in open source software.

An excellent guide and resources for anyone trying to start editing, and publishing videos. I have used few of these to achieve my video. I use Kino to capture, sometimes Kdenlive to slice( No I know how to do it in cinelerra), and finaly use the cinelerra for the rest of the editing, up to encoding. if they asked me what I wish for for my birthday, I would wish for the Kdenlive to be as powerfull as cinelerra, as it is so logical and easy to use. To me most are buggy, but at the end I managed to edit, and put my composition on Youtube. Check it out. ItÅ› all been done with Linux.
Regardless of whether you’re looking for a simple video editor to help you edit footage recorded on your last vacation or a professional solution fit for an aspiring filmmaker, there’s no reason to switch to a different operating system because the number of fantastic Linux video editors has never been greater. Best of all, most Linux video editors are available for free, so you can realize all your video-editing aspirations even if you’re on a tight budget.
OK, as what we use in our office, bearing in mind that we need to do rapid editing and splicing of 1080p video from two fixed point cameras, we use http://www.womble.com/ DVD Wizard. The cameras (yes two) get plugged in, the files are dropped on the time lines and within seconds we can start editing. Moving through the files, editing and splicing, is fluid and quick. Rendering the final product is, of course dependent on format as you’d expect but we tend to batch our work and let the jobs run overnight.
Avidemux is a free video editor designed for simple cutting, filtering and encoding tasks. It supports many file types, including AVI, DVD compatible MPEG files, MP4 and ASF, using a variety of codecs. Tasks can be automated using projects, job queue and powerful scripting capabilities. Avidemux is available for Linux, BSD, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows under the GNU GPL license.
I‘m looking for a free video editor similar to – Adobe Premiere Pro, Apple iMovie, Final Cut Pro or Microsoft Movie Maker under Linux Desktop operating system. My tasks are pretty simple such as cutting, filtering, and encoding tasks etc. Can you provide me a list of FOSS software which can be used for video capture and video editing purposes under Fedora or Ubuntu Linux desktop systems?
What’s great about most Linux video editing software applications is that they tend to be free and open source, which means that anyone can peek under the hood and implement new features or fix bugs. The video editors featured in this article are loosely arranged according to their popularity, but we recommend you go through the entire list because even less popular video editors have a lot to offer.
When working a film convert it from movie format to a bunch of stills (you can render it so. I think andrew has a video on this). Make sure to do this in a unique directory because you get about 24 pics per second. The format for these pics should be png or if you want to do a lot of composting then OpenExr is the way to go but the files are bigger and might slow down and older machine. Think of it this way. PNG has 0-255 for each color of each pixel, whole numbers only. Try multiplying that by .1 and then by 1000 a few times and see what you get. The other system uses floating point math for each dot and that keeps it high quality. PNG works but don’t expect much in the way of high quality compositing.
Thankfully, you can get Content Samurai at a 25% discount off its normal price. (This link will send you directly to the checkout page.) So, instead of its retail price of $47, you’ll only pay $35, saving you $12 a month forever (again, for as long as you keep your monthly subscription after clicking on the previous link and taking advantage of this discount deal).
6.5 Jurisdiction’s Limitations: As some jurisdictions do not allow certain exclusions or limitations by statutory instrument, the liability will be limited to the extent possible within the applicable legislation. To the fullest extent permitted by law, Noble Samurai’s liability for breach of any implied warranty or condition which cannot be excluded or limited is limited to the amount paid by you to Noble Samurai for the Noble Samurai Software out of which liability arose.
IP Rights: means (i) patents, pending patent applications, designs, trade marks and trade names (whether registered or unregistered), copyright and related rights, database rights, knowhow and confidential information; (ii) all other intellectual property rights and similar or equivalent rights anywhere in the world which currently exist or are recognised in the future; and (iii) applications, extensions and renewals in relation to any such rights.
×