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Shotcut is anther video editing software for Linux and it is an interesting one because its UI looks more like a media player than an editor. The software makes editing video very simple with the set of awesome features it has. For basic uses, it will work just fine, but if you need more powerful options, especially for advanced or professional video recording, then it may not be the best. However, with the features it has, it qualifies as a decent video editor for Linux.

Cinelerra *had* the most promise and it’s probably good if you want to run a TV station. However, it’s not creative at all. Simple edits are easy. However, anything else can become a stunt. IMO, Kdenlive has seen the quickest growth. Lives is also doing well. In the next few years we may see those apps grow into the free alternative of Finalcut – but not Cinelerra. It does what it does, and there is no need to change.
I‘m looking for a free video editor similar to – Adobe Premiere Pro, Apple iMovie, Final Cut Pro or Microsoft Movie Maker under Linux Desktop operating system. My tasks are pretty simple such as cutting, filtering, and encoding tasks etc. Can you provide me a list of FOSS software which can be used for video capture and video editing purposes under Fedora or Ubuntu Linux desktop systems?
Also, one of the thing I love from Linux is the variety in the distros. What’s the problem with that? Canonical is doing a great effort to come to home users, more than RedHat or Novell… use then a Debian-based distro like ubuntu, but let us the rest of the people with our distros, with our beloved desktop or window manager… anyway, it doesn’t affect to aplications since we all can compile from source (at least in my case, because I use gentoo and I must always compile from sources), and you can find binaries for debian-based or rpm-based distros.
The point is, I make some of my income from editing video files. They are an important part of our business’s value adding strategies. So I don’t have time to experiment. I need something that works and is easy for our staff to master. Windows and Mac software does and, like most businesses, we’re happy to pay the price so that we can get on with the job. BTW, the package we’re using costs less than $100.00 per seat, has easy to understand configuration and user settings, is easy to master, makes editing, cutting, dubbing a doddle. It also batches files for rendering (from the GUI). it is reliable and robust, comes with excellent support and the authors have been quick to respond to requests for new features. It is also written to actually run in a multitasking environment so we can do other things when video files are being rendered. Linux authors, take note.
That was the first video editing software package I bought for making home movies. It was easy to use, intuitive even, although some bits were a bit clunky. After making 20 or so coasters, it turned out to be near impossible to burn DVDs. Going online I discovered that burning DVDs was a common problem that upgrading wouldn’t help so I bought Vegas. Since my goal is primarily making home movies for distribution to a far flung computer illiterate family (and that isn’t even just the octegenarians) this is important.

Do all this in a basic newly opened blender session. Then click save as default. Then when you open a new blend you will always have these presets select. If you do this mid work in some blend you are working that blend will become your default (almost never what you want to do). You might also want to skim through the addons. Blender has a lot of power that comes turned off by default but nothing much for film editor.

Cinelarra has two versions: the unsupported community version and a commercial edition. Every six months the nice Cinelarra developers release the latest source code. It’s not widely available in the usual distro repositories, but the good Cinelerra-CV folks bundle it up into Arch, Debian, Fedora, Ubuntu, and other distro packages. There is a Cinelarra PPA— Personal Package Archive– for Ubuntu users. PPAs are user-supported repositories for specific applications, like Cinelarra. They’re not official repos, but they allow you to use your normal Ubuntu package manager to install and remove third-party software.

people people just remember that these programs are free and give u an idea and also experience on how to use them without paying, i myself have been a pc user for many year and apple has caught my eye. if i get what i want i`ll be using apple for final cut pro editing and filming but also will be running ubuntu on a dual boot for my other programs. the free programs will help me to understand how the editing process works and final cut will make me better. the best of both worlds! Cheers
Simply wonderful! One of the few cross platform video editors that has lightning fast editing preview without having to create proxy clips for every step owing to GPU preview. A huge advantage considering the amount of time saved in having to not wait for proxy clip generation thereby allowing for a more flexible workflow. Beautifully blended workflow combining a bit of premiere and a slight bit of after effects. Having the control to edit content visually by resizing or moving clips and other elements directly on the editor / viewer gives a tremendous amount of creative freedom. See More
Far from the “it just works” dream, this program just does not work. I have a relatively fast i7 laptop with plenty of RAM, but OpenShot slowed my entire system to a crawl as soon as I started to edit some video. Firefox became unresponsive and OpenShot crashed or at least appeared to do so since a crash report window opened but OpenShot did not close.
It has been a long known fact that there is a larger variety of software products for Windows and Macs compared to Linux. And even though Linux is continuously growing it is still hard to find some specific software. We know many of you like editing videos and that you often need to switch back to Windows in order to make some easy video editing tasks.
Kino is a great program, but it only does standard definition video, and everything has to be converted to DV files (meaning you need a gigabyte for every 5 minutes of video, so editing an hour long video can easily take 12 gigabytes). Sound editing can also be a bit difficult, but one can always export the soundtrack, edit in Audacity, then dub it back in (and I’ve done this for a couple of videos I’ve made). It’s still my favorite video editing program in spite of these limitations, for now.
The developers of the Pitivi editor believe that a video editor should be flexible, and efficient. Users can choose from simple views, to a complex mode that allows experienced users to make finer edits to their project. Users get access to “hundreds of animated effects, transitions and filters”, great looking audio waveforms in the project timeline, and a timeline that supports lots of different video and audio codecs.
Thankfully, you can get Content Samurai at a 25% discount off its normal price. (This link will send you directly to the checkout page.) So, instead of its retail price of $47, you’ll only pay $35, saving you $12 a month forever (again, for as long as you keep your monthly subscription after clicking on the previous link and taking advantage of this discount deal).
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