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Blender – 3D animation suite (cross-platform) : Blender is a 3D graphics application. It can be used for modeling, UV unwrapping, texturing, rigging, water simulations, skinning, animating, rendering, particle and other simulations, non-linear editing, compositing, and creating interactive 3D applications, including games. Blender’s features include advanced simulation tools such as rigid body, fluid, cloth and softbody dynamics, modifier based modeling tools, powerful character animation tools, a node based material and compositing system and Python for embedded scripting.

With this editor, users will get numerous titles and transitions, support for most video and image formats. You also get a fantastic export feature that lets you export files in various formats. As previously mentioned, the software caters to the demands of novice learners; expert users need not be disappointed; it provides support for professional video formats such as 4K.
Pierre and Megan, you’ve been trolling these comments for two full years, now. I can see, after carefully reading all of the commentary and the thought behind each of them, that you both are only here to troll and discourage. Neither of you have offered any real concrete proof of anything, and you’ve used smoke and mirrors to try to defend merely what are empty opinions. After two full years of trolling this particular page it’s about time you both got told to get a life.
Introducing Lightworks, it’s a commercial video editing suite for Linux, Mac and Windows. It’s a non-linear tool with a completely different approach to editing video. Instead of a simple GTK or Qt window that is manipulated by the desktop environment (and themed by it too), the app offers up a full screen editing environment. Lightworks isn’t free. In fact, unlike the other apps on this list it actually requires a monthly subscription to use but it’s worth it if you want to edit and produce video on Linux.

Cinelerra *had* the most promise and it’s probably good if you want to run a TV station. However, it’s not creative at all. Simple edits are easy. However, anything else can become a stunt. IMO, Kdenlive has seen the quickest growth. Lives is also doing well. In the next few years we may see those apps grow into the free alternative of Finalcut – but not Cinelerra. It does what it does, and there is no need to change.
Using Linux does not mean that you can’t have high-quality software on your system. Apart from the video mentioned above editors, there are tons of other software available in the market for Linux. Some of them are aimed at professionals (just like Lightworks, DaVinci Resolve, and Blender), while others cater to the requirements of beginners (similar to Shotcut and VidCutter). Moreover, you will also be able to easily download and install video editors on your Linux system, as most of them are already available on the app store.
The Cinelerra entry needs updating. Not only does the provided install link not work, the separate branch GG Infinity supports 8 Linux distros and provides instructions to auto-update every month (see https://www.cinelerra-gg.org/downloads/). If the different branches are confusing, visit https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinelerra which will clarify it.
Feature wise, Cinelerra looks to be the best fit if you want to do anything serious, and that’s a problem, because it falls apart when doing anything serious thanks to a seriously bug ridden code base. I mean it! This thing is such a race-condition fest, it can’t even open its own project files on my system without crashing! (Start project, add clip, save it, try to load it … freeze!)
Trey has a good point, I don’t want to do much more than combine my video with a few transitions and a soundtrack. Kdenlive works fine for that. My biggest issue with Linux video editing is the lack of good transitions and simple drag and drop functionality. Also DVD menu creation is still really poor on Linux. But over the last four years it has gotten much better.
Gnome peep started this tendency of oversimplification. Some times you do want features. Some times you do want what you call “bloated”. ‘Less is more’ doesn’t mean less is actually more, it means “Do more with less”. It is annoying as hell when programs start to remove stuff that you actually use because they try to follow this blind tendency towards nihilism ad absurdum.

OK, as what we use in our office, bearing in mind that we need to do rapid editing and splicing of 1080p video from two fixed point cameras, we use http://www.womble.com/ DVD Wizard. The cameras (yes two) get plugged in, the files are dropped on the time lines and within seconds we can start editing. Moving through the files, editing and splicing, is fluid and quick. Rendering the final product is, of course dependent on format as you’d expect but we tend to batch our work and let the jobs run overnight.

I‘m looking for a free video editor similar to – Adobe Premiere Pro, Apple iMovie, Final Cut Pro or Microsoft Movie Maker under Linux Desktop operating system. My tasks are pretty simple such as cutting, filtering, and encoding tasks etc. Can you provide me a list of FOSS software which can be used for video capture and video editing purposes under Fedora or Ubuntu Linux desktop systems?
Ankush Das a.k.a. CEO_&[email protected](.in), is a very energetic person who always puts up an evil smile to counter any obstacle in his way. This dude is highly unpredictable and in fact, you can’t know what’s coming from him… be it his articles, generating an aura, or his personality. Here, he mostly covers stuff on the most popular mobile operating system (Android).

Cinelerra is the most advanced non-linear video editor and compositor for Linux. Cinelerra also includes a video compositing engine, allowing the user to perform common compositing operations such as keying and mattes. Cinelerra includes support for very high-fidelity audio and video: it processes audio using 64 bits of precision, and can work in both RGBA and YUVA color spaces, using floating-point and 16-bit integer representations, respectively. It is resolution and frame rate-independent, meaning that it can support video of any speed and size.
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i want a good program that is good for making amvs (animated music videos) basically editing clips, adding effects and audio, which i am sure that most if not all video editing software does. from what i read here if i really want to go advanced i could use blender but i tried blender (for 3d modeling only though) and its quite hard. i will try it again and learn in but i am looking for something a bit simpler yet with lots of good effects. which one on this list (or not on the list) is good for a beginner. i have used Windows Live Movie Maker which is pretty simple and i know my way around it ok, maybe there are some features in it i don’t know about but i know a decent amount about it. maybe i would like something a bit more advanced but not too advanced.
This is an editor specialized on DV files. All other kinds of video are converted to DV, using a lot of time. I tried to import an m2ts of about 130 MB and it tooks more than 5 minutes. Just imagine how much time you would need with GB files… Not to mention the doubled (or more) disk space. After that, it jups to the end of the clip, exactly like Cinelerra. Unusable for me.

Lightworks is a feature-packed video editor with a truly impressive resume. It was used on movies such as The Wolf of Wall Street, LA Confidential, and Pulp Fiction, and there’s nothing stopping you from seeing first-hand why so many professionals like it because you can download it for free and use for 7 days without paying. If you decide that Lightworks is worth your money, you can upgrade to Lightworks Pro and unlock additional features.


The developers of the Pitivi editor believe that a video editor should be flexible, and efficient. Users can choose from simple views, to a complex mode that allows experienced users to make finer edits to their project. Users get access to “hundreds of animated effects, transitions and filters”, great looking audio waveforms in the project timeline, and a timeline that supports lots of different video and audio codecs.
After experiencing various crashes (on Ubuntu 9.04) with Avidemux, LiVES, and Kino, I switched to Cinelerracv. I had avoided switching becasue it was a bit intimidating at first. Then I discovered the tutorials atAkirad, and with some effort, have mastered its capabilities. Combined with FFMPEG (and a neat little GUIfor it called WinFF) and Audacity for specialized audio work, I have a suite that can do whatever I want and produce it in whatever format I desire. Thanks for the reviews. They provide a great path for investigation…
LiVES is supposed to be mature, feature-rich and ready for more professional use-cases and even video jockeying. Both the website and the Wikipedia pages seem promising. However, although I was able to install and open it just fine, it refused to resize properly and did not import a single video. (If there is a “proper” way to import video’s, apart from the way the program makes it possible for users, then I was unable to find it.)

It supports high-definition video, Blu-Ray, 3D, tethered shooting, integration of video, audio, and still images, all the usual effects such as scrolling titles, pans, and fades, animations, speed changes, audio mixing, export to multiple formats and quality levels including YouTube and Vimeo, and tons more. It is under active development and has great community support. This may be the only video program you’ll ever need.

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There’s often this misconception that there are not that many video editing software for Linux out there — however, this is not the case. With the growing popularity of Linux-based operating systems, software development companies have no choice but to focus on making software specially designed for Linux distros. Accordingly, you can find several video editors on the internet for almost any Linux distribution that you are using.
Vidnami promises that you can “Create Stunning Videos Fast” with their app. You can use Vidnami video creation software to turn articles, blog posts and shorter pieces of content into videos in minutes, or so the creators claim. I’ve spent a lot of money having freelancers create videos for me, so I figured I would give Vidnami a shot.
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