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Crash, crash, crash... when it didn't crash I found it to be in that middle zone of more than a basic editor, but not a professional one... features are not very intuitive. It took me more than 30 minutes of randomly clicking to figure out how to adjust the effects applied to a clip and then I was underwhelmed with the options. To be fair... I was looking for something specific when I tried this out. I've used Adobe and other video editors in the past and this just missed my current needs and my expectations based on past experiences. See More
Vidnami is an online video creator software (application) that helps you create fast, easy and professional-looking videos within minutes. It allows you to insert articles into the software and it automatically creates a good-looking video using the text from the article you inserted. It can also add great images, video backgrounds and even text to speech voices.
With this editor, users will get numerous titles and transitions, support for most video and image formats. You also get a fantastic export feature that lets you export files in various formats. As previously mentioned, the software caters to the demands of novice learners; expert users need not be disappointed; it provides support for professional video formats such as 4K.
The easiest answer is perhaps the lack of commercial applications for desktop Linux, even for a popular distribution like Ubuntu. There is no shortage of quality desktop apps like LibreOffice, Firefox, GIMP and VLC – even Minecraft runs perfectly well with OpenJDK Java – but when it comes to multimedia creation, Linux desktop distributions still left behind. With no Photoshop, After Effects, Ableton Live, or Premiere Pro for Linux, we have to turn to alternatives. For image editing, GIMP and Inkscape have Linux pretty well covered, while Bitwig and Ardour meet most Linux audio editing needs. Thus, here follows my review of a few readily available Linux video editing software (I tested them on an up-to-date Ubuntu 18.04 LTS 64-bit system.) This list is not in order from best to worse or vice-verca. As I completed the test for one Linux video editing software, I wrote it down and ranked it based on my experiences.

I’ve had good luck with Lives. I’ve been able to accomplish things with it that I couldn’t figure out how to do with the others. My main use of video is for web sites. I’ve even created a video sequence from a JPEG still which I then manipulated with Lives tools and output as an animated GIF. I further tune the size of the animation in GIMP which allowed me adjust the the frame rate on a per frame basis.
Blender 2.8 makes video editing a LOT easier (start UI, easy to drag file, left click select...). It's still a bit harder to learn than other tools but for power users each shortcut you'll learn can be applied almost everywhere (e.g. pressing "i" on a numeric field to keyframe the value, or "g" to grab and move and element...). It's very powerful especially if you want to also include 3D in your videos. However many standard tasks will take more time in Blender: The preview is slow, to do a high quality zoom in animation you may need to use a Compositor or instead crop, rendering in 10 bits requires a lot of temporary disk storage, video stabilization is also a pain... Overall I'd suggest it more for someone interested in 3D doing also video editing. See More
Avidemux is a free video editor designed for simple cutting, filtering and encoding tasks. It supports many file types, including AVI, DVD compatible MPEG files, MP4 and ASF, using a variety of codecs. Tasks can be automated using projects, job queue and powerful scripting capabilities. Avidemux is available for Linux, BSD, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows under the GNU GPL license.

Preview very slow (need to create a proxy 25% the scale and also resize the render output and even then it's often still slow) Doing a zoom (pan/scan) requires hacks https://blender.stackexchange.com/questions/42094 Transitions are fully manual Playback speed adjustments are very manual especially if you want to keep them in sync with the audio. .... See More
The easiest answer is perhaps the lack of commercial applications for desktop Linux, even for a popular distribution like Ubuntu. There is no shortage of quality desktop apps like LibreOffice, Firefox, GIMP and VLC – even Minecraft runs perfectly well with OpenJDK Java – but when it comes to multimedia creation, Linux desktop distributions still left behind. With no Photoshop, After Effects, Ableton Live, or Premiere Pro for Linux, we have to turn to alternatives. For image editing, GIMP and Inkscape have Linux pretty well covered, while Bitwig and Ardour meet most Linux audio editing needs. Thus, here follows my review of a few readily available Linux video editing software (I tested them on an up-to-date Ubuntu 18.04 LTS 64-bit system.) This list is not in order from best to worse or vice-verca. As I completed the test for one Linux video editing software, I wrote it down and ranked it based on my experiences.
I've a few more things to add to this review, which I will over the next few days. I've published it now because "imperfect action is always preferable to perfect inaction" so, while the spiders get to work on this I'll have a break and fill you in with more stuff very soon. In the meantime, just got and get the 7 day free trial by clicking the BIG SPINNY orange button that I took ages to animate for you - it's a total no-brainer. If you don't like it, cancel - zero risk. If you do, you will thank me (but ONLY if you take action and start making some bloody videos, alright?)
6.1 No Warranties: The Noble Samurai Software is provided “as is” with no warranties whatsoever. Noble Samurai does not, either expressed, implied or statutory, make any warranties, claims or representations with respect to the Noble Samurai Software, including without limitation, warranties or conditions of quality, performance, non-infringement, merchantability, or fitness for use for a particular purpose. In addition, Noble Samurai does not represent or warrant that the Noble Samurai Software will always be available, accessible, uninterrupted, timely, secure, accurate, complete and error-free nor does Noble Samurai warrant any connection to or transmission from the internet.
Gnome peep started this tendency of oversimplification. Some times you do want features. Some times you do want what you call “bloated”. ‘Less is more’ doesn’t mean less is actually more, it means “Do more with less”. It is annoying as hell when programs start to remove stuff that you actually use because they try to follow this blind tendency towards nihilism ad absurdum.
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