c

Internet Marketing Mozie is a online marketing blog bringing your the latest reviews on IM products, SEO Software and Services, Internet Marketing Guides, PLR Products and WordPress tools. I have been blogging and doing internet marking for around 10 years now and have learned a lot. Check out my blog to get in depth reviews of the best IM products, services and tools out there! And get my free online business coaching courses if you sign-up to my email list. (They're easily worth $297 or more!)
After briefly testing all the various open-source video editors I could find easily available for fedora 13, I came to the conclusion that kdenlive was the best fit. By and large most of the editors were plain unusable for more than 5 minutes or just had too many limitations. kdenlive has its own faults, including that its documentation is not always clear and one must refer to it constantly when figuring out the UI (hint: video tutorials were so useful to understanding the docs). Essentially, I can now do almost anything I need to with kdenlive now, but I would greatly appreciate it if the devs could improve rendering time, update the dvd creation wizard to support blu-ray, and add more rendering options (for example, ogv output does not support quality levels, only bitrates). As for stability, I saw several crashes when I was first exploring features, but none since.
Not knowing what you need it to do, it is hard to comment but it is very easy to use just for movies. You just open up the track you need and position it on the timeline thingy. You then put the next track on the next line. You can then add blends or whatever you want and you can edit each track right there in the viewer. When you are done just render it out. It is true that this bit of blender is just a small bit in a very big program but if you focus on just this little bit you can learn it in a few minutes.

Introducing Lightworks, it’s a commercial video editing suite for Linux, Mac and Windows. It’s a non-linear tool with a completely different approach to editing video. Instead of a simple GTK or Qt window that is manipulated by the desktop environment (and themed by it too), the app offers up a full screen editing environment. Lightworks isn’t free. In fact, unlike the other apps on this list it actually requires a monthly subscription to use but it’s worth it if you want to edit and produce video on Linux.

Trey has a good point, I don’t want to do much more than combine my video with a few transitions and a soundtrack. Kdenlive works fine for that. My biggest issue with Linux video editing is the lack of good transitions and simple drag and drop functionality. Also DVD menu creation is still really poor on Linux. But over the last four years it has gotten much better.
Even though Olive is in the early stages of development (version 0.1.0 Alpha at the time of writing this article), some users are already using it to produce content on a regular basis, and its developers are making rapid progress, which is evident from their activity on GitHub. Hopefully, they’ll be able to keep up the current pace and give all Linux users the video editor they deserve.

The trade off is often money fortime, and the market reflects that. Tools aimed at “pros” tend to be expensive because they are based upon the money saved by their market. Few amatuers or casual users will fork out thousands of dollars for software in order to save a bit of time–even if it would be cost-effective for them, since many people never bother to do cost-benefit analysis.


Content Samurai promises that you can “Create Stunning Videos Fast” with their app. You can use Content Samurai video creation software to turn articles, blog posts and shorter pieces of content into videos in minutes, or so the creators claim. I’ve spent a lot of money having freelancers create videos for me, so I figured I would give Content Samurai a shot.
×