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I can always find answers to my questions just by asking google. The community is very active, and there are many tutorials for any job, from simply change speed, pan and zoom in your videos to color correction and compositing. With different workflows described, told by different people, in different ways, so you can pick ones that match your level of skills, and personal preferences. See More
An excellent guide and resources for anyone trying to start editing, and publishing videos. I have used few of these to achieve my video. I use Kino to capture, sometimes Kdenlive to slice( No I know how to do it in cinelerra), and finaly use the cinelerra for the rest of the editing, up to encoding. if they asked me what I wish for for my birthday, I would wish for the Kdenlive to be as powerfull as cinelerra, as it is so logical and easy to use. To me most are buggy, but at the end I managed to edit, and put my composition on Youtube. Check it out. ItÅ› all been done with Linux.
Applying effects is as easy as drag and drop. But if you want to edit them, you'd need to right click on each clip and select Properties. You'd need to experiment with not-so-well documented parameters which take forever to preview just to see if you are on the right track. It is sort of easy to learn unless you want more than drag and drop controls. See More
The latest version of DaVinci Resolve features a dual timeline that allows users to quickly navigate the whole edit and trim without zooming and scrolling. There’s also a brand-new video editing engine that leverages machine learning to enable features such as facial recognition, speed warp, and others. All in all, DaVinci Resolve shows just how far Linux video editors have come over the years.
I’ve had good luck with Lives. I’ve been able to accomplish things with it that I couldn’t figure out how to do with the others. My main use of video is for web sites. I’ve even created a video sequence from a JPEG still which I then manipulated with Lives tools and output as an animated GIF. I further tune the size of the animation in GIMP which allowed me adjust the the frame rate on a per frame basis.
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Ya know, I have to chime in here. I am using Ubuntu. I love it but what I don’t love is the attitude of some of the Ubuntu techies. I am not a programmer but I am far from computer illiterate, in fact, over the weekend I was in the company of a computer programmer who complimented me on my knowledge…self-taught at that. I like the challenge of Ubuntu but sometimes you just need a question answered that will help you move on to your next phase of research. I sometimes spend weeks…WEEKS, researching a problem before I ask a question. And that is not a complaint…I like doing the research. What I don’t like are the snotty responses you sometimes get from the techies…almost as bad as Mac lovers. So I have learned not to bother with the Ubuntu support sites so much and just do general research on the ‘net , like YouTube (where I have found many of my answers, thank you). On the one hand…it’s too bad some of the attitudes are so cheeky. On the other hand, I learn a lot.
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Kino always seems to be neglected when people are discussing Linux video editing. Perhaps it is considered too basic? I’ve found it superb for simple editing, adding titles, etc of youtube clips and home video. The interface is very intuitive and easy to grasp for the casual video editor. I am sure kdenlive would be a better program but it crashes every time I have ever tried it. I just downloaded latest version now Feb 2010 and crashed within 20 secs of using it. Tried latest pitivi just now also and locked up immediately. Kino is reliable, reasonably attractive, and does the basic job well.

After experiencing various crashes (on Ubuntu 9.04) with Avidemux, LiVES, and Kino, I switched to Cinelerracv. I had avoided switching becasue it was a bit intimidating at first. Then I discovered the tutorials atAkirad, and with some effort, have mastered its capabilities. Combined with FFMPEG (and a neat little GUIfor it called WinFF) and Audacity for specialized audio work, I have a suite that can do whatever I want and produce it in whatever format I desire. Thanks for the reviews. They provide a great path for investigation…
It has got a tremendous range of tools and techniques to provide the best experience of audio video editing. There are 2 move and 3 trim tools alongwith 4 techniques of appending, overwriting and inserting a clip on the timeline. Another great feature of this video editor is that if has more than 50 image filters and more than 30 audio filters to ensure the best video and audio editing output.
I have worked with several commercial offerings including Final Cut Pro, Premiere and Video Wave. I recently used Cinelera (on Ubuntu Hardy) on several projects and I like it very much. Cinelera is much more powerful than Video Wave and is more near the class of Final Cut Pro and Premiere. Sure, Cinelera has some stability issues from time to time but they are not major and it also recovers nicely since it saves your most recent changes anyway. To be fair, I have seen similar stability issues with the commercial products as well so I do not find this aspect of Cinelera any different.
I’ve used video editing software in Windows, and there is *nothing* intuitive about it. All of the software programs I’ve used are so loaded with DRM that trying to burn your home movies to DVD is a an adventure, often in futility. One of the commercial “home use” software package I bought was fairly intuitive, but the DRM made it incapable of burning DVDs. My prime reason for wanting to be able to video edit is so I can put together home movie compilations for all the computer illiterates and senior citizens in my family. They watch movies on TV and can just about handle popping a DVD in. I’m tired of having some of my homemade DVDs work in Dad’s machine, but then refusing to play in my sister’s.
I’ve twiddled around with a few of the programs mentioned here but they all seem horrifically counter-intuitive. That is to say, I could not figure them out. (and I have the strong motivation of a soccer team clamoring for their annual ‘best of’ movie.) Windows might be f#2%ed, but Apple is downright frightening these days. Free is more and more the only way to go.
An excellent guide and resources for anyone trying to start editing, and publishing videos. I have used few of these to achieve my video. I use Kino to capture, sometimes Kdenlive to slice( No I know how to do it in cinelerra), and finaly use the cinelerra for the rest of the editing, up to encoding. if they asked me what I wish for for my birthday, I would wish for the Kdenlive to be as powerfull as cinelerra, as it is so logical and easy to use. To me most are buggy, but at the end I managed to edit, and put my composition on Youtube. Check it out. ItÅ› all been done with Linux.
OK, as what we use in our office, bearing in mind that we need to do rapid editing and splicing of 1080p video from two fixed point cameras, we use http://www.womble.com/ DVD Wizard. The cameras (yes two) get plugged in, the files are dropped on the time lines and within seconds we can start editing. Moving through the files, editing and splicing, is fluid and quick. Rendering the final product is, of course dependent on format as you’d expect but we tend to batch our work and let the jobs run overnight.
Just like OpenShot, it is incredibly easy to learn and use this software. Flowblade gives its users the features of video transitions, watermarks, batch rendering, and drag & drop support. In addition to that, it also supports various image/audio/video formats. It also supports proxy video editing. As I already mentioned, it’s a method of editing in which original media clips are presented on a timeline by proxy clips for light-weight editing. The full resolution of the video will be used while wrapping up the project.
You can develop your very own motifs. You can add your very own logo designs and brand name watermarks, consist of great background pictures as well as different textures along with individualizing the font styles and colors quickly (just a few clicks of the computer mouse) to make extra professional-looking video clips as well as match your company’s/ site’s design and also look.
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