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Blender 2.8 makes video editing a LOT easier (start UI, easy to drag file, left click select...). It's still a bit harder to learn than other tools but for power users each shortcut you'll learn can be applied almost everywhere (e.g. pressing "i" on a numeric field to keyframe the value, or "g" to grab and move and element...). It's very powerful especially if you want to also include 3D in your videos. However many standard tasks will take more time in Blender: The preview is slow, to do a high quality zoom in animation you may need to use a Compositor or instead crop, rendering in 10 bits requires a lot of temporary disk storage, video stabilization is also a pain... Overall I'd suggest it more for someone interested in 3D doing also video editing. See More
The ubiquitous Kdenlive strikes again. It has been around for years and is used by many people. I tried to use it a few months ago, but it was completely unusable. It often didn’t start, and when it did, it crashed and refused to export properly. However, for this article, I installed the latest version from the Kdenlive PPA and tried it out. Things have changed. Oh my, how things have changed.

This video editor has the ability to move things in the visual space straight in the viewer panel compared to the others where you need to change some value of x or y to scale or move things in your composition. This might not matter much in many cases but if you have a lot of elements moving or scaling throughout your scene, this is the fastest and a much more intuitive method than having to adjust the scale/position values of individual axes separately. This again is a big reason why I prefer an alpha (a damn good alpha) version of this software than a stable release of Kdenlive. See More
Look at the screenshot I attached above. I want you to look at the left sidebar. The #01 “Getting Started” video is what I just walked you through. You can see there are more video instructions. The videos are between 2 and 5 minutes long each, so it doesn’t take long at all to become acquainted with the software. The 5 additional training videos include the following topics.
Whether you’re cutting a feature or just editing a short or two or even a youtube video, having an NLE that you don’t have to wonder about (whether it’s going to just slowly fall apart) is preferable. What is the basic stuff most people use? I’m a rather accomplished editor and I find that even for the simplest projects I tend to use advanced techniques. However, that doesn’t stop me hoping that someday someone is going to create an NLE for Linux (commercial or not) so that I can make the switch full time. Because I love the command line and I love the free part, and I like being part of the friendly community…the more time I can spend hacking wifi the better.
I use Blender 3d for most of my video editing. You can do things with it that you would not beleave! Problem is that Blender3d is its own world and learning it takes time. It is something for a pro with some 3d modeling skills or a normal person that can read and is willing to learn the GUI. Wait for Blender 3D 2.5 to come out. It has an all new interface and new improved work flows! Should be out in a month or two…
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I am getting a bit sick of comments like this. Use BLENDER 3D!!!!!!!! It does not crash, it is powerful and it has more features than anything that you could pay for. How many programs out there can do camera tracking? Inserting animanton into your film using camera tracking? Complex fades that interack with your own art work? Plus of course all the basics. Be sure to watch the new film coming out that is made by the Blender foundation using almost nothing but blender. It is called Tears of Steal and should be out soon! (late August 2012)
Lightworks is a feature-packed video editor with a truly impressive resume. It was used on movies such as The Wolf of Wall Street, LA Confidential, and Pulp Fiction, and there’s nothing stopping you from seeing first-hand why so many professionals like it because you can download it for free and use for 7 days without paying. If you decide that Lightworks is worth your money, you can upgrade to Lightworks Pro and unlock additional features.
Coming from a film editing background I *know* how to edit, it’s just the tools I need to master. It should not be that hard. What’s finally pushed me over the edge is that the windows codec is broken (I have the worst lemon version of XP you can imagine) so that I can’t even see the images for the thousands of hours of video I have recorded with my Canon camera in the premium video editing software available for Windows But I can’t replace the codec because Windows thinks it works, so it won’t reinstall. Which is too bad because I slaved to learn that bloody commercial editing software that cost a bomb and got quite good at it. But intuitive? No way, Pierre.
This video editor has the ability to move things in the visual space straight in the viewer panel compared to the others where you need to change some value of x or y to scale or move things in your composition. This might not matter much in many cases but if you have a lot of elements moving or scaling throughout your scene, this is the fastest and a much more intuitive method than having to adjust the scale/position values of individual axes separately. This again is a big reason why I prefer an alpha (a damn good alpha) version of this software than a stable release of Kdenlive. See More
With this editor, users will get numerous titles and transitions, support for most video and image formats. You also get a fantastic export feature that lets you export files in various formats. As previously mentioned, the software caters to the demands of novice learners; expert users need not be disappointed; it provides support for professional video formats such as 4K.

Blender – 3D animation suite (cross-platform) : Blender is a 3D graphics application. It can be used for modeling, UV unwrapping, texturing, rigging, water simulations, skinning, animating, rendering, particle and other simulations, non-linear editing, compositing, and creating interactive 3D applications, including games. Blender’s features include advanced simulation tools such as rigid body, fluid, cloth and softbody dynamics, modifier based modeling tools, powerful character animation tools, a node based material and compositing system and Python for embedded scripting.
It has been a long known fact that there is a larger variety of software products for Windows and Macs compared to Linux. And even though Linux is continuously growing it is still hard to find some specific software. We know many of you like editing videos and that you often need to switch back to Windows in order to make some easy video editing tasks.

Far from the “it just works” dream, this program just does not work. I have a relatively fast i7 laptop with plenty of RAM, but OpenShot slowed my entire system to a crawl as soon as I started to edit some video. Firefox became unresponsive and OpenShot crashed or at least appeared to do so since a crash report window opened but OpenShot did not close.


I’ve twiddled around with a few of the programs mentioned here but they all seem horrifically counter-intuitive. That is to say, I could not figure them out. (and I have the strong motivation of a soccer team clamoring for their annual ‘best of’ movie.) Windows might be f#2%ed, but Apple is downright frightening these days. Free is more and more the only way to go.

Looking to quickly edit a video on Linux? Consider using Shotcut. It’s a non-linear, cross-platform, multi-track video editing tool that is great and easy to use. The video editor has support for adding titles, cutting and splicing clips together, as well as keyframe options, and more. It’s certainly not as complex as something like Lightworks, or as user-friendly as OpenShot, but it’s a solid editor that can get the job done. If you’re looking for a competent video editing tool, Shotcut might be a great choice.
Nevertheless, when you find the elusive, easy to use video editing software that has the features I mention, that doesn't crash, or at least when it does crash recovers files the user was working on, that doesn't need constant tweaking using the shell, that has reasonable, non obfuscated documentation in understandable english, please let me know. I will buy you a beer and the software without hesitation.
I’ve had good luck with Lives. I’ve been able to accomplish things with it that I couldn’t figure out how to do with the others. My main use of video is for web sites. I’ve even created a video sequence from a JPEG still which I then manipulated with Lives tools and output as an animated GIF. I further tune the size of the animation in GIMP which allowed me adjust the the frame rate on a per frame basis.
It has been a long known fact that there is a larger variety of software products for Windows and Macs compared to Linux. And even though Linux is continuously growing it is still hard to find some specific software. We know many of you like editing videos and that you often need to switch back to Windows in order to make some easy video editing tasks.
Ya know, I have to chime in here. I am using Ubuntu. I love it but what I don’t love is the attitude of some of the Ubuntu techies. I am not a programmer but I am far from computer illiterate, in fact, over the weekend I was in the company of a computer programmer who complimented me on my knowledge…self-taught at that. I like the challenge of Ubuntu but sometimes you just need a question answered that will help you move on to your next phase of research. I sometimes spend weeks…WEEKS, researching a problem before I ask a question. And that is not a complaint…I like doing the research. What I don’t like are the snotty responses you sometimes get from the techies…almost as bad as Mac lovers. So I have learned not to bother with the Ubuntu support sites so much and just do general research on the ‘net , like YouTube (where I have found many of my answers, thank you). On the one hand…it’s too bad some of the attitudes are so cheeky. On the other hand, I learn a lot.
Pitivi has been around for a few years too. This video editor for Linux is a GNOME application and is designed to fit into the GNOME desktop. (I assume it will work just fine in KDE or XFCE too.) Installing it requires the use of Flatpak, but they give rather easy-to-use instructions on the Pitivi website, and I had no problems at all. Drag-and-drop seems to be well supported, and it first transcodes videos before they can be used, which takes a few minutes or seconds, depending on the size of each. But it appears the videos can still be used during this process.
If you're new to SEO, you might not be that impressed, but believe me, this is impressive. Do you think the video will rank on page 1 of Google soon? Hell yes! There are a whole load of video SEO techniques employed with this that I've not got time to go through in this review, but you can learn about through any of my online courses or by reading my book: "The Best Digital Marketing Strategy in the Galaxy (Probably)" - there's a whole chapter in there 🙂
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