c

Shotcut is anther video editing software for Linux and it is an interesting one because its UI looks more like a media player than an editor. The software makes editing video very simple with the set of awesome features it has. For basic uses, it will work just fine, but if you need more powerful options, especially for advanced or professional video recording, then it may not be the best. However, with the features it has, it qualifies as a decent video editor for Linux.
There’s often this misconception that there are not that many video editing software for Linux out there — however, this is not the case. With the growing popularity of Linux-based operating systems, software development companies have no choice but to focus on making software specially designed for Linux distros. Accordingly, you can find several video editors on the internet for almost any Linux distribution that you are using.
You can develop your very own motifs. You can add your very own logo designs and brand name watermarks, consist of great background pictures as well as different textures along with individualizing the font styles and colors quickly (just a few clicks of the computer mouse) to make extra professional-looking video clips as well as match your company’s/ site’s design and also look.
Just like OpenShot, it is incredibly easy to learn and use this software. Flowblade gives its users the features of video transitions, watermarks, batch rendering, and drag & drop support. In addition to that, it also supports various image/audio/video formats. It also supports proxy video editing. As I already mentioned, it’s a method of editing in which original media clips are presented on a timeline by proxy clips for light-weight editing. The full resolution of the video will be used while wrapping up the project.
The only criticism I might have for Kdenlive is that it looks like an open source program. It isn’t the most user-friendly application to work with and appears to have been programmed by someone who knows what they are doing but expects you to also know what they are doing. It isn’t the most polished experience, and some things seem to be a bit obtuse to do.

LiVES is supposed to be mature, feature-rich and ready for more professional use-cases and even video jockeying. Both the website and the Wikipedia pages seem promising. However, although I was able to install and open it just fine, it refused to resize properly and did not import a single video. (If there is a “proper” way to import video’s, apart from the way the program makes it possible for users, then I was unable to find it.)


Blender – 3D animation suite (cross-platform) : Blender is a 3D graphics application. It can be used for modeling, UV unwrapping, texturing, rigging, water simulations, skinning, animating, rendering, particle and other simulations, non-linear editing, compositing, and creating interactive 3D applications, including games. Blender’s features include advanced simulation tools such as rigid body, fluid, cloth and softbody dynamics, modifier based modeling tools, powerful character animation tools, a node based material and compositing system and Python for embedded scripting.
Shotcut is anther video editing software for Linux and it is an interesting one because its UI looks more like a media player than an editor. The software makes editing video very simple with the set of awesome features it has. For basic uses, it will work just fine, but if you need more powerful options, especially for advanced or professional video recording, then it may not be the best. However, with the features it has, it qualifies as a decent video editor for Linux.
Regardless of whether you’re looking for a simple video editor to help you edit footage recorded on your last vacation or a professional solution fit for an aspiring filmmaker, there’s no reason to switch to a different operating system because the number of fantastic Linux video editors has never been greater. Best of all, most Linux video editors are available for free, so you can realize all your video-editing aspirations even if you’re on a tight budget.

People who dislike Linux usually say that it’s not great for professional, high quality video production and as a result the industry ignores it and doesn’t take it seriously. This isn’t entirely true.  It is very much a fact that Apple Computer will never release Final Cut Pro for Ubuntu, and Adobe will never make a FlatPak version of Premiere, but it doesn’t matter. Some commercial, professional video editing tools do find their way onto Linux.


I’ve used video editing software in Windows, and there is *nothing* intuitive about it. All of the software programs I’ve used are so loaded with DRM that trying to burn your home movies to DVD is a an adventure, often in futility. One of the commercial “home use” software package I bought was fairly intuitive, but the DRM made it incapable of burning DVDs. My prime reason for wanting to be able to video edit is so I can put together home movie compilations for all the computer illiterates and senior citizens in my family. They watch movies on TV and can just about handle popping a DVD in. I’m tired of having some of my homemade DVDs work in Dad’s machine, but then refusing to play in my sister’s.
Paul, this is the biggest problem with getting linux accepted. “If you can’t figure it out, theres always fisher price.” that attitude makes people who are having difficulty turn back to other operating systems. Not everyone out there is a computer geek, many have no clue about terminal or how to find and install software. Windows has wizards, with Linux, sometimes you need to be a wizard. So lighten-up and remember that people will judge linux by the people they meet. Be an ambassador for the movement, not an ass.
Look at the screenshot I attached above. I want you to look at the left sidebar. The #01 “Getting Started” video is what I just walked you through. You can see there are more video instructions. The videos are between 2 and 5 minutes long each, so it doesn’t take long at all to become acquainted with the software. The 5 additional training videos include the following topics.
×