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Pitivi could be described as the Linux alternative to Windows Movie Maker. Both video editors have a clear user interface that doesn’t present its users with a steep learning curve, and both are intended to help regular people express themselves through videomaking. Of course, Windows Movie Maker is no longer in development, whereas Pitivi is developed by a fantastic community of people who believe in open source software.
The trade off is often money fortime, and the market reflects that. Tools aimed at “pros” tend to be expensive because they are based upon the money saved by their market. Few amatuers or casual users will fork out thousands of dollars for software in order to save a bit of time–even if it would be cost-effective for them, since many people never bother to do cost-benefit analysis.

Last 5 years of my 7 years Linux experience I was regularly challenged by day-to-day video editing tasks. Main content was 720p/1080i/1080p in ts/m2ts/mp4/mov. The most useful instruments that produced a really nice results was combination of avidemux, kdenlive and VirtualDub (under Wine). As per my experience you are able to get excellent results with those tools but the problem is workflow really uncertain and not stable sometimes. Lack of features also has place. But the situation changes. Right now Kdenlive project is really nice. It has tons of features and stable enough for relatively serious editing/finishing. I am sure this won’t be too hard for any person interested to learn Kdenlive workflow. Otherwise this person is too lazy for Linux in general. You may find plenty of video lessons on ytube/vimeo.
Applying effects is as easy as drag and drop. But if you want to edit them, you'd need to right click on each clip and select Properties. You'd need to experiment with not-so-well documented parameters which take forever to preview just to see if you are on the right track. It is sort of easy to learn unless you want more than drag and drop controls. See More
This video editing software offers customizable layout support, a clip list, a multi-track timeline, automatic backup, keyframe special effects, and transitions. Are you using any unique file format or camcorder? Not a problem — Kdenlive supports almost everything available. It should also be mentioned Kdenlive supports Mac OSX and FreeBSD as well. Another important feature is the Proxy editing. This cool feature can automatically create low-resolution copies of your source clips to allow light-weight editing, and then render using full resolution.

Whether you’re cutting a feature or just editing a short or two or even a youtube video, having an NLE that you don’t have to wonder about (whether it’s going to just slowly fall apart) is preferable. What is the basic stuff most people use? I’m a rather accomplished editor and I find that even for the simplest projects I tend to use advanced techniques. However, that doesn’t stop me hoping that someday someone is going to create an NLE for Linux (commercial or not) so that I can make the switch full time. Because I love the command line and I love the free part, and I like being part of the friendly community…the more time I can spend hacking wifi the better.
The latest version of DaVinci Resolve features a dual timeline that allows users to quickly navigate the whole edit and trim without zooming and scrolling. There’s also a brand-new video editing engine that leverages machine learning to enable features such as facial recognition, speed warp, and others. All in all, DaVinci Resolve shows just how far Linux video editors have come over the years.
Ubuntu, and Linux in general is not known as the go-to platform for multimedia production. Instead, Apple Mac systems are probably the most popular systems for graphic designers, video editors, and music production specialists, with Windows PCs coming a close second. But Linux also has a lot of good stuff for video editors, it’s another thing that most people don’t know it. So here is a collection of best video editing software for Linux in 2018.

Cinelerra is the most advanced non-linear video editor and compositor for Linux. Cinelerra also includes a video compositing engine, allowing the user to perform common compositing operations such as keying and mattes. Cinelerra includes support for very high-fidelity audio and video: it processes audio using 64 bits of precision, and can work in both RGBA and YUVA color spaces, using floating-point and 16-bit integer representations, respectively. It is resolution and frame rate-independent, meaning that it can support video of any speed and size.


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people people just remember that these programs are free and give u an idea and also experience on how to use them without paying, i myself have been a pc user for many year and apple has caught my eye. if i get what i want i`ll be using apple for final cut pro editing and filming but also will be running ubuntu on a dual boot for my other programs. the free programs will help me to understand how the editing process works and final cut will make me better. the best of both worlds! Cheers
Looking to quickly edit a video on Linux? Consider using Shotcut. It’s a non-linear, cross-platform, multi-track video editing tool that is great and easy to use. The video editor has support for adding titles, cutting and splicing clips together, as well as keyframe options, and more. It’s certainly not as complex as something like Lightworks, or as user-friendly as OpenShot, but it’s a solid editor that can get the job done. If you’re looking for a competent video editing tool, Shotcut might be a great choice.
Content Samurai promises that you can “Create Stunning Videos Fast” with their app. You can use Content Samurai video creation software to turn articles, blog posts and shorter pieces of content into videos in minutes, or so the creators claim. I’ve spent a lot of money having freelancers create videos for me, so I figured I would give Content Samurai a shot.
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